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5180 Views 18 Replies Latest reply: Jun 6, 2011 8:41 PM by caniseetoo RSS 1 2 Previous Next
caniseetoo Amateur 34 posts since
Mar 29, 2011
Currently Being Moderated

Apr 22, 2011 5:09 AM

Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

Does anyone run with plantar fasciitis?  I am training for a 10 mile run on May 1st and after my long run yesterday the bottom of my heel began to hurt.  I can't begin to imagine that I can not compete in the race I have been training for for three months.  I have been icing and stretching the foot and I will call the foot doctor today to make an appointment, but I am afraid he will tell me not to run and I really don't want to hear that!  So, I am writing for a glimmer of hope here.  I know that the only "cure" is rest, but I was wondering if the running will make it worse? and if I can continue to train for my race next Sunday or will I have to *sob*, *gulp* bow out. 

Any and all advice is welcome, even if it's "not what I want to hear".  Thank you!  Ruth

  • Surfing_Vol Legend 848 posts since
    Nov 6, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Apr 22, 2011 5:40 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Thank goodness, no, but I've had it before.  Hand massage of the plantar fascia seemed to really work.  Dig your thumbs in and work on manipulating the tissue.

     

    You're smart going to see an expert, but PLEASE make sure that you see a running expert.  My experience is that doctors, PAs, PTs, etc. who are runners or triathletes give significantly different advice than those who aren't.

     

    Your body is ultimately going to tell you whether you can run or not.  Regardless, I would strongly recommend allowing 48 hours between runs and to substitute good cross training on non-running days.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Surfing Vol





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    Surfing Vol

    "Victory through attrition!"

    Charleston Half-Marathon 1/15/2011 -- 1:52:03

    The Scream! Half-Marathon 7/16/2011 -- 1:56:00

  • Janine28004 Amateur 15 posts since
    Mar 15, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Apr 22, 2011 6:02 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    I had bad plantar Fasciitis in both feet before I started working out.  In January I started on the elliptical and within a couple weeks it was basically completely gone.  I would imagine it was the stretch that did it.  Sorry that is the only advice I can give.  A good way to ice it is to freeze a bottle of water and then roll it under your foot.





    Janine

    Milwaukee, WI

    Do Life Tour Chicago 5K -- July 4, 2011

    Madison Mini Marathon 5K -- August 20, 2011


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  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,389 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Apr 22, 2011 6:22 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Also work on stretching the calf/achilles.  Tightness there can contribute to PF.  The only time I had PF I ran through it, but I think I had a fairly mild case.  I also used an over-the-counter orthotic to provide additional support.  Start to finish was at least four months.  (It was long ago and I don't remember exactly.)  You'll just have to work on it and decide come race day whether you can do it or not.

     

    Len





    Len

  • Leshock Amateur 12 posts since
    Jul 1, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Apr 22, 2011 6:24 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Hand massage is nice, but your best bet is to use an ice cup massage.  Freeze water in a paper cup.  Then tear back the rim so that you have a nice circular massage to work with.  Be sure to put a towel under your foot, but massage the area for about 10-15 minutes.  You can do this 3 times a day.

     

    Another exercise is to use a tennis ball to loosen up (and let's face it, break up scar tissue) the area by rolling it around the bottom of your foot.  This is painful but easy, and something you can do while watching TV.

     

    Best of luck with your running.  If you want more advice or training tips I can be reached at coach@nerunningservices.com





    www.NERunningServices.com

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  • Labsrus2 Expert 51 posts since
    Mar 25, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Apr 23, 2011 4:46 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    I also had this pretty bad where it was hard to walk.

     

    I do a lot of stretching of the lower legs and feel and ankles before I even think about stepping out of bed in the morning.

     

    I do a stretch where I lean on the kitchen counter with both feel flat on the floor and hold it for 30 seconds or more to stretch out the calf area, my foot doctor, who is a runner suggested that.

     

    I also have really well fitted running shoes and inserts to run in.  I think having good running shoes is the key.





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  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,160 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Apr 23, 2011 3:11 PM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    You see the different approaches here to your heel? Some center on   the heel itself, and others on the stretching. Both are very important.   One reason why the calf stretch helps with heel pain is that one of the   most common symptoms of calf muscle strain is pain on the bottom of  the  heel. This can spread to the achilles area as well and is often  mistaken  for achilles tendonitis.

     

    To check to see if it  is  more heel than calf, find a spot on the rear of your Tibia bone,  about  halfway up from heel to knee, where the achilles tendon turns  into  muscle. Sitting down with your leg propped up in front of you on a   stool, knee bent, work that spot with your thumbs and see how  sensitive  it is, and if the pain radiates downward to the achilles and  heel. If it  does, you most surely have an issue there. It's an easy  muscle for a  runner to strain. When you feel you have worked out the  kinks in this  muscle and it can relax, a stretch will be safe, but not  necessarily  before.

     

    The calf muscles transmit their power down the  achilles, which wraps  around the heel. When the muscles are tight, the  pressure is constant,  and soreness can be too, even with or without a  bone spur. Anything you  do to release this pressure will speed healing. Good luck!

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/19/Gray438.png/250px-Gray438.png

    Gray's, with thanks.. of course!

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,160 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Apr 25, 2011 4:05 PM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Well, the chickens have come home to roost, and the heel is very    sore. The longer a tight calf continues, the less rest and recovery a    poor heel will get. One of the most common symptoms of calf muscle    strain is heel pain, and we discussed one of the most commonly strained   muscles in  runners, the Soleus muscle, or main plantarflexor. This is   the one  that gets the most stretch when the knee is bent, because it   resides  entirely on the lower leg. The upper calf muscle Gastroc gets   its  stretch with the knee straight, since its upper heads connect to   the  Femur bone. A tight Gastroc tends to manifest in the arch or the knee. When   both are  tight, you can get diagnoses of plantar fasciitis because of the   pain from  arch to heel, but this is only the end of the story. While   there may be  inflammation and resulting spurs, the cause of both is   usually that  relentless strain on the target tissue.

     

    If   you have  simply iced and stretched, you haven't yet gotten to the   source of the  tightness. Muscle fibers can contract whether we wish to   stretch them or  not, and when they stay contracted, we often call them   "tight." The offending  fibers of the Soleus are best checked as   suggested earlier, but  checking is not solving. A lot of athletes use a   foam roller at this  stage, often the wrong way, unfortunately, but   treating the soft tissue  directly is the right thing to do. Stretching   is the "icing on the cake"  after the muscle is no longer actively   contracting, even if it is only  in a few of its many fibers. Icing,   however, is best used to dull pain  and fight inflammation. It can mask   or delay pain, but does little to  enhance healing except in contrast   with heat, to stimulate circulation.

     

    An  easy way to treat   the soft tissue in almost any setting is built right  into your body.   Simply cross the bad calf over your knee, and let the  knee sink into   the calf as you slowly lower the foot with a gravity  assist. If this   hurts a lot, it needs the work. If the calf muscle is  really tight and   it does not hurt you are pretty tough. Toughness  notwithstanding, you   need to relax that muscle if you want any chance of  restoring that  heel  back to normal. The round-the-clock pressure on the  heel has got  to  go. Feeling better is a plus, but eliminating the cause  is a must. I  know you are working very hard on it, but relapse with these muscles is  very common.

     

    If  the pain is more behind the Achilles, there is   another muscle  higher  up between the bones at the center of the calf,   called Tib  Posterior,  that mimics Achilles tendonitis and at times,   plantar  fasciitis. You  can still get to it with the knee, but it is   deeper, and  the Soleus  must be relaxed to access it. If the pain is   more from the  heel to  inner ankle, there is a fat muscle that fleshes   out your foot,  running  from the inner edge of the heel through the   inner arch called  the  Abductor Hallucis (Abductor of the Big Toe).  Pain  in that muscle is   often mistaken for a heel spur or plantar  fasciitis,  along with   tendonitis involving the medial malleolus.


    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/49/Tibialis_posterior.png/148px-Tibialis_posterior.png

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bf/Abductor_hallucis.png/207px-Abductor_hallucis.png

  • Surfing_Vol Legend 848 posts since
    Nov 6, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Apr 25, 2011 4:18 PM (in response to JamesJohnsonLMT)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    JamesJohnsonLMT wrote:

     

    Well, the chickens have come home to roost, and the heel is very    sore. The longer a tight calf continues, the less rest and recovery a    poor heel will get. One of the most common symptoms of calf muscle    strain is heel pain, and we discussed one of the most commonly strained   muscles in  runners, the Soleus muscle, or main plantarflexor. This is   the one  that gets the most stretch when the knee is bent, because it   resides  entirely on the lower leg. The upper calf muscle Gastroc gets   its  stretch with the knee straight, since its upper heads connect to   the  Femur bone. A tight Gastroc tends to manifest in the arch or the knee. When   both are  tight, you can get diagnoses of plantar fasciitis because of the   pain from  arch to heel, but this is only the end of the story. While   there may be  inflammation and resulting spurs, the cause of both is   usually that  relentless strain on the target tissue.

     

    If   you have  simply iced and stretched, you haven't yet gotten to the   source of the  tightness. Muscle fibers can contract whether we wish to   stretch them or  not, and when they stay contracted, we often call them   "tight." The offending  fibers of the Soleus are best checked as   suggested earlier, but  checking is not solving. A lot of athletes use a   foam roller at this  stage, often the wrong way, unfortunately, but   treating the soft tissue  directly is the right thing to do. Stretching   is the "icing on the cake"  after the muscle is no longer actively   contracting, even if it is only  in a few of its many fibers. Icing,   however, is best used to dull pain  and fight inflammation. It can mask   or delay pain, but does little to  enhance healing except in contrast   with heat, to stimulate circulation.

     

    An  easy way to treat   the soft tissue in almost any setting is built right  into your body.   Simply cross the bad calf over your knee, and let the  knee sink into   the calf as you slowly lower the foot with a gravity  assist. If this   hurts a lot, it needs the work. If the calf muscle is  really tight and   it does not hurt you are pretty tough. Toughness  notwithstanding, you   need to relax that muscle if you want any chance of  restoring that  heel  back to normal. The round-the-clock pressure on the  heel has got  to  go. Feeling better is a plus, but eliminating the cause  is a must. I  know you are working very hard on it, but relapse with these muscles is  very common.

     

    If  the pain is more behind the Achilles, there is   another muscle  higher  up between the bones at the center of the calf,   called Tib  Posterior,  that mimics Achilles tendonitis and at times,   plantar  fasciitis. You  can still get to it with the knee, but it is   deeper, and  the Soleus  must be relaxed to access it. If the pain is   more from the  heel to  inner ankle, there is a fat muscle that fleshes   out your foot,  running  from the inner edge of the heel through the   inner arch called  the  Abductor Hallucis (Abductor of the Big Toe).  Pain  in that muscle is   often mistaken for a heel spur or plantar  fasciitis,  along with   tendonitis involving the medial malleolus.


    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/49/Tibialis_posterior.png/148px-Tibialis_posterior.png

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bf/Abductor_hallucis.png/207px-Abductor_hallucis.png

    James,

     

    Again, an incredibly helpful post.  I assume the diagram of the foot with Morton's toe was just a coincidence.


    Surfing Vol





    Presentation1.jpg

    Surfing Vol

    "Victory through attrition!"

    Charleston Half-Marathon 1/15/2011 -- 1:52:03

    The Scream! Half-Marathon 7/16/2011 -- 1:56:00

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,160 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Apr 26, 2011 2:28 AM (in response to Surfing_Vol)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Lol I guess it was a coincidence. I didn't even  notice, but so many of  Gray's illustrations use this foot, It's likely  at least one of the  source cadavers was a Morton's sufferer. It is an  eerie reminder of that polymerized  muscle exhibit from China called  "Bodies," featuring many specimens  with black lungs, I suppose from a  life of smoking. Unfortunately both conditions are too common. On the  one hand are those whose addiction usually leads to an early grave, and  on the other an involuntary condition that often results in a life of  pain or inactivity. Running certainly makes us confront both of these  problems head on!

  • Biggest_T Amateur 31 posts since
    Mar 11, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Jun 1, 2011 9:23 AM (in response to caniseetoo)
    Re: Running with Plantar Fasciitis?

    Just read your thread, and got some helpful tips for myself.  But now I'm curious...how was your 10 mile run!!? 

     

    ~Tory





    ~Running. Cheaper than therapy. Safer than drugs. -Me, 2011

    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

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