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1188 Views 3 Replies Latest reply: Apr 22, 2013 4:25 AM by Chris Maza RSS
Chris Maza Rookie 2 posts since
Mar 19, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Apr 21, 2013 4:52 PM

Fat, slow and want to run the Boston Marathon...

I want to run next year's Boston Marathon.

I don't care about time. As a Massachusetts resident who stood in the exact spot where one of the bombs went off three years ago when I watched my wife run for the finish, I want to do it as a tribute to all affected by what has happened over the last week and to prove to the world that when you hit us, we're only going to come back even stronger.

Here's the issue.

I'm 30 years old, around 250 pounds, I run 5ks and occasionally 10ks on around a monthly basis.

I have no idea how to train for a marathon, or any kind of significant distance for that matter.

Anyone with any tips or programs that they would suggest to get me ready?

Thanks in advance!

Chris from Massachusetts

Loving that dirty water for as long as I can remember.

  • SeeKatMomRun Rookie 2 posts since
    Nov 15, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Apr 21, 2013 6:23 PM (in response to Chris Maza)
    Fat, slow and want to run the Boston Marathon...

    Hi Chris!

     

    I had to click on your link due to your subject like First, I admire your courage and dedication. I know the bombings affected all of us in some way.. whether we are runners or not. I appreciate your willingness to reach out.

     

    Second, I have not run a marathon myself and am looking to run next year too. I have, however, done a lot of training for 5Ks and have run a few. I just signed up for the Run to Remember 5 mile (8K) event next month.

     

    Third, the fact that you have actually run 5Ks and 10Ks is HUGE! You are at least in the running mode, but it just seems like you need some focus on your activity and diet. There are several apps that I have used for runnning. Some are free and some are low cost. Couch to 5K got me into running and made it easy. I was told when I was 12 by a Coach that I was NOT a long distance runner. I kept that with me and then forgot.. therefore, I always had it that I couldn't run long distance. I got the Couch to 5K app on my iPhone and did all the training on my own. I ran outside and at our Y and completed it and it was EASY. I was amazed. Although you have run 5Ks before, you may want to look at that as a starting point as it's a run, walk, run, walk type of program to build up your stamina.

     

    There's also the app Bridge to 10K, which starts where the 5K leaves off.. if you have run a 5K recently and feel that you can keep a good 12 or 11 minute mile, start with that one. It's desinged the same way.

     

    For the marathon, I just bought the 100 Day Marathon Plan, It's online and you can Google that to find it. I haven't started it yet, but I researched it a lot and it's gotten great reviews from many folks. They are also on Facebook if you want to join that page and look at some of the questions and comments. I found my research for the 100 Day Marathon Plan great as it starts from Beginner or Seasoned Runner to get a better time. I figure I have a year to train (although if I want to qualify it has to be by September) and worst case is I don't get a bib and run what I can.

     

    The other thing you can do obviously is get a Coach. If you have the funds, that would be the best way to go as you get individualized plans including diet and exercise. I have a great guy who is local to Brighton and trained my friend who was NOT a runner into an Ironman. He now runs Half Ironmans and beat his time this year by a couple minutes. (I'll include my email address if you want his name.)

     

    If you haven't already signed up, why don't you take on running the Run to Remember next month? If you have run a 5K and 10K you can easily take on the 5 mile challenge. You can then talk to people who have run marathons or the staff for additional info.

     

    Bottom line is you have a lot of options. Last, I am a independent health and wellness coach and can direct you to some home workout progarms that can assist you with losing weight and getting in shape (along with your running training).

     

    Let me know if I can be of assistance! Hope to see you at the Run to Remember!

     

    Best,

     

    Kathy G

    kathy.gaalaas@gmail.com

    facebook.com/KathyGaalaas

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Apr 21, 2013 7:55 PM (in response to Chris Maza)
    Fat, slow and want to run the Boston Marathon...

    "I want to run next year's Boston Marathon."

     

    LOL  You and a few million other people. Not to make light of your feelings.  There are three ways you can run it.

    1. Run a qualifying time in another marathon. As Kathy G. mentioned, this has to be done before registration in September. Qualifying time for a 30 yo male is 3:05:00.

    2. Run for a charity. Probably your most realistic option, though the fundraising tends to be pretty steep. But you'll be running for two causes.

    3. Run as a bandit. This is likely a long shot. The organizers will almost certainly be extra vigilant next year just because of the many people who would like to run but won't be able to get an official entry. Plus to my mind this puts the lie to what you're trying to do. You want to run to show your support for your community but you're going to steal it.

     

    As for training, you said your wife ran it. So she should have a pretty good idea of what is involved in training. Sounds like a good place to start. You at least are realistic enough to understand your lack of training and knowledge. This may also argue for the charity route. Most charity programs offer training advice, a support group and group runs as part of their package. They also tend to be more oriented toward the novice marathoner. Fundraising, as I said, tends to be steep. Those I've looked at are in the $4000 - $5000 range. Still, this may be your best bet.





    Len

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