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403 Views 1 Reply Latest reply: Jun 5, 2013 7:05 AM by justamaniac
DavidSutherland4304 Rookie 1 posts since
Aug 20, 2012
Currently Being Moderated

Jun 5, 2013 5:15 AM

What type of foot?

So I have been running for a little while now and when I first started I went to a local running store and had my feet sized for shoes. They said that I have normal pronation, not under or over. I have since worn those shoes out and went into another shoe store for another pair and they said that I have overpronation.....I wasn't sure if they were right since I had been told that I had normal pronation so I went to another store (same owners) and they said the same thing......... Who to believe....... I have had my gate analyzed and they said I have a normal pronation as well. I'm soooo confused as to what type of shoes I need. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Dave

  • justamaniac Legend 206 posts since
    May 30, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jun 5, 2013 7:05 AM (in response to DavidSutherland4304)
    What type of foot?

    I think the answer is really simple:  How does your stride feel to you, and how to do the shoes feel when you run?

     

    My feeling is that the folks in running stores, while more knowledgeable about running shoes than the average joe, are not always qualified to judge a runners form. Many are sincere in wanting to help you and provide useful information, but ultimately, they are there to sell shoes.

     

    When it comes to pronation, it is purely a judgement call and a matter of opinion. My suggestion is to select a pair of shoes that "feel" right to you, spend some time walking in them (preferably on carpet or somewhere that you won't overly scuff the soles of the shoe), and if they don't feel right after a bit, return them.

     

    I've experimented with a lot of shoes and, yeah, I've returned some.  The net-net here is that you are going to be investing ~$100 and quite frankly, they need to feel right to you when they run.

     

    It does not sound like you have a serious pronation issue, so I would not make too big a deal out of it.  The salesfolks may make mention of it in order to sound informed and such, but I think that it is all mostly sales talk.  Absorb the information, nod understandingly, and make your own decisions.

     

    Good luck!

    -bill

    http://runningthrutime.blogspot.com

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