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839 Views 5 Replies Latest reply: Aug 19, 2013 10:00 AM by MLAbid RSS
MLAbid Rookie 3 posts since
Aug 13, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 13, 2013 8:12 AM

Knee and hip pain

I've recently started running and training for a 5k this coming Saturday (8/17). I've had a few days with some pain on and off and took a few days off to recover (I over trained a few weeks). The last week I can't even do a warm up jog without any knee or hip pain. I've had shin issues in the past and just changed shoes and put new insoles in my shoes. I know"rest" is the magic pill just didn't know if there are some suggestions so I can run on Saturday. I had decreased my miles times 3 minutes during training and really thought I was going to run a good time.

 

Thanks.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,333 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 13, 2013 9:19 AM (in response to MLAbid)
    Re: Knee and hip pain

    You lowered your pace by 3 minutes per mile?  Even though you "recently started running"?  That's pretty much the definition of "too much, too fast, too soon", and could easily be considered overtraining.  It is likely to be a major contributor to your aches and pains, in my opinion.  Rest is probably necessary at this point.  And a re-evaluation of your running goals would be in order, as well as a double-check of your stride and footplant, to make sure they're not adding to your problems.  Whether you can make the 5K on Saturday is only up to you and your pain level.  I'm not sure why you decided to change shoes, but that may also be a factor.  I don't recommend the use of aftermarket insoles without a good reason.  You buy a particular shoe because you think it will work well for you and it feels good.  Why then, immediately make changes with an aftermarket insole?





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,333 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 13, 2013 7:33 PM (in response to MLAbid)
    Knee and hip pain

    Were your old shoes minimalist?  If you changed from a "conventional" shoe to a minimalist shoe (low heel-toe drop, less cushioning), switching can cause some problems, but usually to calves and achilles.  Most advocates of minimalist shoes say they have fewer problems with knees and hips.  But the switch combined with the rapid running build up - in speed if not in mileage - has the potential for injury.  Also, even though you are familiar with the insoles, they may interact differently with the new shoes.  You may have just made too many changes in a short period of time.  There are a lot of variables here and changes generally should be introduced gradually.  You might take a close look at your stride and footplant to make sure that you haven't made changes that might be adding to your pains. Make sure you are not overstriding: landing with your knee/leg straight and your foot well in front of your body.  This can cause extra stress on knees in particular.

     

    Roads are generally considered to be more forgiving than sidewalks.  I personally don't find the difference to be great.





    Len

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,146 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Aug 13, 2013 7:39 PM (in response to MLAbid)
    Knee and hip pain

    I think the problem with concrete is more than the fact that it is completely inflexible at the runner's level of pressure. What start out as completely flat little jointed slabs begin from day one to assume slightly different angles on different planes as the soil underneath them shifts, while we may continue to perceive them as flat. This subjects us to tiny jolts and twists we are not psychologically prepared for. It would be better if the sidewalk was painted with the image of mountain rock.

     

    About the only truly predictable surface is a treadmill, yet many have problems with them, probably because they never change, except for gradients (which I don't recommend on a long-term basis). Of course, any XC runner can tell you that uneven surfaces cause injuries too. The only thing worse than something that never changes, or something that changes too much, is something that subtly changes when it looks like it's not.

     

    Though you recently switched from sidewalks to roads, you may just now be feeling the effects of running on the sidewalks earlier. My advice is to stick to level roads, as in parks or low-traffic areas, and to eschew the sidewalks whenever possible. Just avoid ambient noise-excluding headphones, know your traffic patterns, and be careful not to get run over.

     

    Yah, I think you may have overtrained. The best strategy is to honor the work you did by trusting it to carry you through this race. For now, you are in taper. That is, just keeping busy enough to avoid getting soft. My strategy for Saturday would be to go out easy with an eye on your realistic competition (you know, "I can take this guy"). Don't let things get too far out of hand either way. If you feel good after the first half or so, keep the pressure on. Focus on running under control and outlasting the others. Expect surprises of all kinds. Look for a good race, but not your best. That will come later. If the pain comes back, relax and run it as a trainer, and consider it a wake-up call. Peace out.

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