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3982 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: Jun 1, 2014 2:39 AM by GeoWolf RSS
willmily Rookie 2 posts since
Mar 17, 2014
Currently Being Moderated

Mar 17, 2014 8:28 AM

How long do you stay on each week?

I want to enjoy running and so would like to run some of the daily runs over and over till they feel comfortable before I move on. Im on week 5, day 2 and it was really hard to run. The leap up to 20 minutes without walk break seems huge from two lots of 8 minutes. How do I know when I'm being 'too easy' on myself?

  • Chuck1945 Amateur 17 posts since
    Nov 15, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Mar 17, 2014 1:56 PM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    First a disclaimer, I have never done the C25K. That out of the way,do you have any additional goals beyond "enjoy running"? If you are trying to get ready for a 5K in the near future sticking to the program may be a good idea, otherwise you can enjoy running simply by doing it. Repeat the prior week, make up your own schedule (for example instead of jumping to 20 minutes, do 2x10 minutes with a walk break in between) To get better, you will need to push yourself to go further, dont worry about faster that will come with time.

  • justamaniac Legend 189 posts since
    May 30, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Mar 18, 2014 9:15 AM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    I also have not done a C25K program, but I want to second Chuck1945's comment that you should push yourself to go further rather than continueing to repeat. In my short running lifetime (all of 5 years), I have found that better endurance results in being able to run with a bit more ease and with better form. Speed seems to be the result of having the endurance to go the distance....

     

    Good luck!

    -bill

    http://runningthrutime.blogspot.com

  • cnfwriter Rookie 3 posts since
    Feb 12, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Mar 27, 2014 10:21 AM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    There's nothing wrong with repeating a week until you feel stronger at that base.

     

    I came to a similar fork in the training-plan road and opted to repeat a week. I felt I was making slow-but-steady progress, but at the end of one of the weeks I still felt I was pushing the edges for me. I chose not to go to the next level until I felt like I had something left in the tank at the end of current week.

     

    It's good to push yourself and all, but it can also lead to over-excersion and put you on the sideline permanently if you're not careful. If you feel pretty spent at the end of the week you're on, or it is a supreme struggle to get through the next level, there's no shame in establishing a physical base camp where your at and acclimating to the new altitude before pushing for the summit. The summit ain't goin' nowhere.

  • julsnlb Rookie 1 posts since
    Aug 10, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Apr 3, 2014 9:25 AM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    I can say, I started the C25K right after I quit smoking...two months later I ran my first 5k.  I think you could try a 5K and you would be shocked at the ednurance you will have once you are there.  With the right music, the time flies by and there will always be someone behind you, so you don't have to worry about being in the back.  You can try one 5k to set a baseline time, whether you ran the entire time, and use it as a goal stepper.  It will also encourage you to sign up for more and beat your time. 

     

    Good luck!

  • AllanHoltz Rookie 6 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Apr 9, 2014 4:22 PM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    I would suggest you buy a decent heart rate monitor.  When you find you are running at a lower heart rate for the effort you are exerting, THEN your body is ready to move to a harder effort if you want.  A harder effort might mean a slightly faster time, a longer distance, speed intervals.  You should not do ALL of these harder efforts during the same run.

     

    I have been running now for 22 years.  I am 64 and have run over 250 races of a marathon or longer.  Last year I only finished one out of 7 attempts of my favorite distance race (trail 100-mile ultras).  So this winter on my treadmill every day I picked 2 days for running speed intervals, something I had not done in several years because up until last year I COULD finish 100s yet.  I also quit eating desserts and have lost 6-8 pounds of body fat over the winter.  I'm hoping an old body CAN learn new tricks!  For me at my age and training style history 5.4 miles/hour flat on my treadmill was the pace I started at in late November, after both donating blood and my last race.  I did that every other day and on alternating days I walked at 12% grade (my treadmill maximum) at 3.2 mph.  My heart rate for 30 minutes to 2 hours averaged between 106-110 bpm for both of these slope/speed combinations.  After 3 weeks my heart rate had recovered a bit from my blood donation and I was feeling a little stronger having recovered from having run 3 marathons, a 100k and 68 miles of the Bear 100 mile race in the previous 6 weeks.  Yeah, I was exhausted (totally).  Then in mid-December on Tuesdays I started with running 8 mph flat for 0.1 mile and then 5 mph flat recovery for 0.1 mile and I would repeat that for 5-6 miles.  I would start these intervals after an initial 0.5 mile warm-up wherein I would start walking flat at 3 mph and every 0.025 miles increase my speed by 0.1 mph till reaching 5 mph.  My heart rate the first 8 mph segment spiked to 125 bpm and by 5-6 such miles it spiked at 143 bpm.  On Wednesdays I would do intervals of the same 0.1 mile lengths at 12% slope only running 5 mph (fast) and walking 3 mph (recovery) and I would did this for 3-4 miles.  My heart rate climbing would reach a couple bpm higher and get down a couple bpm lower due to the longer times at these speeds.  After 4 weeks of this I saw my heart rate spikes/peak getting 3-5 bpm LOWER and the the speed sessions "felt" easier.  I then lengthened the fast segments to 0.15 miles while keeping the recovery sessions at 0.1 miles.  The first week I did that it was hard.  After 4 weeks it felt better and my heart rate spikes/peak had dropped a little and i went to 0.2 miles at high speed (still 8 mph flat and 5 mph at 12% slope).  After 4 weeks that felt better, but I was only 3 weeks out from my first planned 100-mile race of the year so I started to cut back on my distance each day and keept the speed of each session the same.  On Thursdays I (in December) ran steady pace flat starting at 5.4 mph for 5-7 miles and every 4 weeks increased it by 0.1 mph.  On Fridays I walked steady pace for 3-4 miles at 3.2 mph at 12% slope.  On Saturdays I ran 12-18 miles flat at 5.4 mph.  On Sundays I walked 7-10 miles at 12% slope and 3.2 mph.  On Mondays I ran 5-6 flat miles at 5.4 mph.  Each week that I increased the length of my speed segments I also increased by 0.1 mph the speed of all my other run runs and walks.  I ended up having to stay home and not run my first intended race of the year (Umstead 100 mile run) due to a family emergency, but my second race is this Friday, so I just maintained my same speeds and distances for another week, except that yesterday I was able to run a shortened (3 mile) flat speed session wherein I ran from 2.4 to 2.9 miles at 8 mph and my heart rate only reached 137 bpm.  This shows how much improvement my body has achieved over the course of this winter by using some speed sessions each week with a 4 week time constant between increasing efforts.  I felt like I could have easily gone further also at 8 mph this past Tuesday, but with a 100 coming up this Friday I did not want to chance it.  I will not run now until start of race.

     

    I think if you study what I described, you will discover a "system" varying your running schedule on a weekly basis of hard and easy efforts each day or each couple days (never doing more hard efforts (distance or speed) more than 2 days in a row).  For beginners, I do not think doing "hard" sessions more than one day hard and 2-3 days easy is appropriate.  What is hard and what is easy is UP TO YOU!!!  But using a heart rate monitor and SEEING what YOUR heart rate is when your effort feels hard versus when if feels easy will go a LONG way in helping you define a running plan that will fit your goals.

     

    Get fit, stay fit, run long, enjoy life - it is the only one you will ever have!

  • iamloved22 Rookie 7 posts since
    Jun 8, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Apr 17, 2014 3:51 AM (in response to willmily)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    Great job! Don't repeat unless you absolutely can not finish the workout. You are more capable than you think you are! When I coach new runners with the couch to 5k program I always ask them not to read ahead on the schedule.

  • Pipper99 Rookie 3 posts since
    Jun 11, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. May 16, 2014 1:02 PM (in response to iamloved22)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    I'm 53, and I finished the C25K plan yesterday. At my pace, I'm only running about 2 miles in the time alloted. Should I continue on with Week 8 Day 3 for a while until I get up to 3.1 miles, or should I move on to the 10K training and try to increase my pace with that program? It appears to be the consensus that I should not start over with Week 1 Day 1 and try to go at a faster pace that way.

  • shipo Legend 455 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. May 16, 2014 4:53 PM (in response to Pipper99)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    Pipper99 wrote:

     

    I'm 53, and I finished the C25K plan yesterday. At my pace, I'm only running about 2 miles in the time alloted. Should I continue on with Week 8 Day 3 for a while until I get up to 3.1 miles, or should I move on to the 10K training and try to increase my pace with that program? It appears to be the consensus that I should not start over with Week 1 Day 1 and try to go at a faster pace that way.

    It sounds like what you need to do is build a really good base without worrying about pace.  Were it that I was coaching you, I would recommend you work on running longer (or further, depending upon your preference).  Once you get up to say one hour (or say six miles) without needing to take a break, then you might want to consider working on a faster pace.  That said, once you're running six miles at a crack, you'll find that you're pace will be way-way faster than it is today.

  • Pipper99 Rookie 3 posts since
    Jun 11, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. May 17, 2014 1:23 PM (in response to shipo)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    Thank you so much! I was hoping that would be the better course. :)

  • GeoWolf Pro 100 posts since
    Jul 28, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jun 1, 2014 2:39 AM (in response to Pipper99)
    How long do you stay on each week?

    Being a slow runner I have added time trying to get to 5K.  Of couse every flipping time I get close I get sidelined.    I'm waiting to get back in now after another months off jag.  I actually did 2 different 5K's late last year but one was a mud run and there was a lot of waiting in line for obstacles.  The other I walked several times.  More than I needed to because I was with a group, but it was a blast.  I was looking at 50 to 55 minutes to run 5K and I was at about 48 minutes jogging and just could not push myself further without risking falling.   I was hoping that another week or 2 and I'd break that barrier.  Only I got depressed after my aunt died and just stopped running for over a month.  I managed to do some runs and then I found out I needed a biopsy.  Healed from that, ran once and got a bad cough that lasted almost 2 months.  I did some light jogging seeing where I stood and needed an excisional biopsy.  Which I'm healing from now.  I really should have and could have run more between but it's been so hard to get back into the rythem.  I stuck to the program for timed runs until I hit the 30 minute mark.  Then I used the timer so that I would know how long I ran, but when it got to the cooldown I'd back it up and run as far as I could push myself safely.  Then I would push it forward to the cooldown.  That way I got my total distance.  I considered going to the 10K program but for me I think it would have been a bit depressing when I couldn't make it the entire 5K and I was also limited by only having an hour to finish including my warm up and coolddown.  (I did let myself go late in order to finish 5K with a walk at the end)   I am sure that with time I will get faster because my first mile was faster than the 2nd and the 2nd was faster than the last.   I'm guessing that once I'm steady throughout I will run about a 15 minute mile and then I will work on distance and a bit on speed.  Unless I decide later that I can take more time. 





    Get up and try again! I think I must be setting a record for how many times I've been sidelined in my quest to actually run an entire 5K. Back injury, bronchitis, knee injury, bad cold, broken toe, biopsy. I am determined to make it.

    2013 - Gritty Goddess Mud Run (Run/Walk)

    2013 - Firefly Run (Run/Walk)

    2014 - ??

    My 6 year old ran in the Gritty Kids Mud Run and I couldn't keep up. LOL

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