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2356 Views 15 Replies Latest reply: Mar 31, 2014 4:12 PM by RunningMan2050 RSS 1 2 Previous Next
JenniLucas Rookie 3 posts since
Mar 14, 2014
Currently Being Moderated

Mar 23, 2014 12:42 PM

Issue with Endurance.

Hello,

I started couch to 5k 6 weeks ago. I am having some difficulties that are starting to effect my confidence and jogging. 30 minutes to an hour before running I drink a serving of x-plode. I strech a bit and and do part of my brisk walk on my way to my apartment's gym. I fnish the brisk walk on the treadmill typicaly having it set to 4. When I jog I have the treadmill set to 6. Each and every time I can jog to 6 minutes before I absolutely lose It and get worn out. I'm supposed to jog for 22 minutes straight and I feel like a piece of crap because I can't make It past 6 minutes. I drink amino acids, take fish oil, and am on a low carb diet. I am 24, 5"7, and about 155lbs. What are your recommendations? Thank you for reading.

 

- Jenni

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Mar 23, 2014 1:51 PM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Issue with Endurance.

    The most likely thing to try first is to slow down.  I'm not sure what it means to have the treadmill set to 6.  Find out what the pace is in minutes per mile.  I'm not sure what you expect to gain by taking x-plode, amino acids, etc.  Fish oil has nothing to do with it.  A low carb diet probably is not doing you any favors - carbs are a basic fuel source for exercise like running.





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Mar 23, 2014 5:33 PM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Re: Issue with Endurance.

    Ha, ha ... that is a really good question.  My treadmill has a speed readout in miles per hour or kilometers per hour.  MPH and KmPH are listed below the readout.  Hopefully the treadmill you are using also has some indication near the speed readout.  A manual would help but since it is not yours that might not be available.  Is there an attendant in the gym who might be able to help?  Running at 5.5 instead of 6 might do the trick, if you have no way to be sure of the readout units.  I'm not a great believer in supplements as a short-term fix.  That is, I don't think they do much for your immediate workout, but are more of a long term thing with a cumulative effect.  But as you said, any information that might relate is helpful.





    Len

  • 23putts Rookie 2 posts since
    Mar 23, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Mar 23, 2014 5:48 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Issue with Endurance.

    Sounds like you are running to fast.  Set a pace that is enjoyable you can run for the full 22 minutes. 

  • jojosullivan7 Rookie 1 posts since
    Mar 25, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Mar 25, 2014 7:03 PM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Re: Issue with Endurance.

    I would suggest slowing down to a more comfortable pace. When you find the pace that is appropriate for you build from there.

  • cnfwriter Rookie 3 posts since
    Feb 12, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Mar 25, 2014 9:07 PM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Re: Issue with Endurance.

    I have this same problem. One thing that has helped me tremendously is to do a progressive warmup first.

     

    You want your warmup to slowly and smoothly bring your body from a state of rest to a state of activity. Start with small moves and progress to larger, quicker moves.

     

    Now, before I start running, I take at least 15 minutes to warmup. I start by walking, then alternating walking with baby-step running along with small arm movements. I then repeat the walk/light-jog warmup with ever-increasing range of motion in legs and arms. At the tail-end of the warmup session, I briskly walk, perhaps for about the last 2 minutes of the warmup session. Then the run begins.

     

    I have found that if I bring my body from a state of inactivity to a state of activity too quickly, I reach saturation faster and tire quickly. But when I employ a progressive warmup to prepare my body for the shock to come, I do much better.

     

    I know you said that you walk briskly to your apartment gym, but that might not be enough of a warmup.

  • JHBHawk Rookie 2 posts since
    Feb 18, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Mar 26, 2014 10:08 AM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Issue with Endurance.

    I had a similiar issue around Week 6.  With the walk/jog alternating I was able to jog much faster due to the rest times provided by the walks.  However, when the program went to straight jogging I really struggled to keep the pace I thought I should have (based upon the prior workouts).  I went down to 5.2 (mph per treadmill) and worked back up to 5.4.  As others said,, you need to find a pace that is comfortable to maintain.  Some people reference being able to "hold a conversation" while jogging but I workout on a treadmill with no one to talk to. 

     

    The best advice an experienced runner gave me was not to worry about my pace, focus on jogging for the time allotted and bring your pace down to what is needed to accomplish that.

     

    I'm on Week 9 now and the 5.4 pace is what works for me.  Find what works for you.

     

    Congratulations on making it this far! 

  • Julie Ann Hackett Legend 228 posts since
    Nov 20, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Mar 26, 2014 11:12 AM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Issue with Endurance.

    If setting the treadmill to 6 isn't working for you, try a slightly slower pace.  There's nothing wrong with going a little slower if it means you can complete your planned workout.  My best PR came from a training plan that focused on slower runs because that's what I needed to stay motivated. The fast runs were wearing me out.  Because I was able to complete the training going slower, I logged more miles than I would have if I had pushed too hard and skipped workouts.  Go at your own pace and you'll enjoy running so much more.

  • RunningMan2050 Rookie 7 posts since
    Mar 4, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Mar 27, 2014 3:13 PM (in response to JenniLucas)
    Issue with Endurance.

    How is everyone handling their breathing?  I seem to completely run out of breath by the third or fourth run cycle.  I'm currently on W2, D3 of my C25k program and it's very difficult for me to finish up the 90s runs without being completely gassed.

     

    I read that I should breathe through both my nose/mouth and try to breathe down into my stomach along with my jogging pace -- breathe in for 4 steps, exhale for 3 ... but am I supposed to hold at some point?

     

    I'm trying to get my endurance such that I can get to week 6 and do full time jobs, but right now that's looking further and further away.

     

    Any advice/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  Heck, my shins are still sore after one of these low week cycles; I'm incredibly out of shape. 

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Mar 27, 2014 6:04 PM (in response to RunningMan2050)
    Issue with Endurance.

    Slow down.  As if there weren't enough hints in this thread already. 

     

    There are several recent threads that include various philosophies on breathing.  Basically it comes down to "do what works for you".  I can't get enough air just through my nose and breathe mostly through my mouth.  I typically breathe in 3 out 2 or in 2 out 2.  "Belly breathing" yes, using the diaphragm helps to do a better job of filling the lungs.

     

    But going a little slower will do more at this point tham playing aroung with your breathing.





    Len

  • RunningMan2050 Rookie 7 posts since
    Mar 4, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Mar 30, 2014 12:02 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Issue with Endurance.

    Hi lenzlaw,

     

    My issue I think is that I really cannot slow down any more than I have -- or I'll just always be walking.  When I switch from the walk to the run, I'm not really running -- it's more like a slow jog.

     

    I don't know if this matters, but I find that the slower I go, the more my feet are on the ground (ie: I end up taking shorter strides) and that causes more impact and my shins get sorer faster -- as if I am slamming down on the ground.  Not only that but I always feel as if my feet are only just barely off the ground.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,373 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Mar 30, 2014 2:44 PM (in response to RunningMan2050)
    Issue with Endurance.

    I thought we were talking about being gassed during the run phases.  If you are then you are most likely running too fast for your current (running) fitness level.  Which raises the question of your running pace.  What is it (in minutes per mile if you know, or mph)?  And shorter strides have a lot to recommend them, including, usually, lower impact forces.  Take note of where your foot is in relation to your body when it lands.  Generally, it should be under you, not in front, and your knee should be flexed.  Getting your feet off the ground is more a matter of your kick and activating your glutes at the back of your stride, which also contributes to stride length.  There's a pretty good article "It's All In The Hips", in the April issue of Running Times that talks about some of this and might be worth a read.





    Len

  • RunningMan2050 Rookie 7 posts since
    Mar 4, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Mar 30, 2014 5:32 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Issue with Endurance.

    We were talking about being gassed during the running phases -- but my "run" phase is more of a "jog".  I can't really run for 60, much less 90 seconds yet. 

     

    I believe my "run" (really, my jog) is at about 10mpm, give or take.  I wonder why I feel like I'm hitting harder when I take shorter strides -- I am going to make a note to pay specific attention to where my foot lands.  I do notice that when I'm jogging, I don't feel the shin soreness as much when I lean further forward.

     

    I can also tell you that during my "run" phases, my heart rate gets up to about 165bpm at about the 60s mark and climbs to about 180 by the 75-80s mark (it reads VO2 Max).  It takes me the full 90s walk period to get it back down to the 130's, sometimes a couple few seconds longer.

     

    Thanks for the tip on Running Times!  I don't currently subscribe but I will do a quick search for it and see what I can find.  I'm going to check around tomorrow and see if there is some place local to me that can watch me jog and tell me what I'm doing wrong.

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