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2175 Views 16 Replies Latest reply: Aug 8, 2014 7:21 AM by JirinPanthosa 1 2 Previous Next
JirinPanthosa Amateur 28 posts since
May 23, 2013
Currently Being Moderated

Jun 18, 2014 8:52 AM

How much running to do in a week?

Hello, I started running about 2 years ago and I'm trying to balance training for half marathons and also for Obstacle Course Races.  I'm 31 and before 2 years ago I never ran farther than a mile in my life.

 

I'm signed up for my first half marathon in October and my 5K PR is 24:30 which I just set last week.  Two weeks ago I also got my first top 100 finish at an OCR at the Superhero Scramble.  My training tends to be about 60% street running, 30% bodyweight exercises, 10% trail running, but the trouble I'm running into now is that as I increase the amount of running I do in a week I'm having much more trouble recovering.  Recently I've increased to about 20 miles in a week.  A month ago I pushed my long run to 11 miles and finished feeling good at an 8:45 pace, but last week I tried to push it to 12 and ended up not being able to continue due to knee pain after 9 miles at 9:15 pace.

 

Any advice for balancing my training in a way that I'm able to increase my distance, incorporate all the functional fitness for the OCRs, and still be able to recover?

 

Full disclosure, I ran three OCRs in the last month all of which were very hilly and two of which are 9+ miles, so that may be playing a big factor.

  • justamaniac Legend 208 posts since
    May 30, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jun 18, 2014 10:26 AM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    Ahhh... the "how much should I / can I train" conundrum....

    There are tons of training programs and regiments available online, but ultimately it will be you that modifies the selected program to suit your abilities and goals.  One thing holds true: the more miles you do, the better your endurance.  But the more time you spend on your feet, the greater the opportunity for injury (and yes, you will injur yourself - it happens, but you will recover...).  Your knee issue may have been a result of that, who knows.  And remember that if you continue to train while injured, you will remain injured.

     

    You have a lot of time until your HM in October, so my very humble advice (I am not a trainer) would be to select and modify a HM training program to get you to a long run of 12-14 miles, build a nice base of 25-30+ miles per week (whatever is most comfortable and practical to you), with one day a week of speed work.  For the rest of your runs, just run comfortably, run within yourself.  If you have the gene, speed will come.

     

    Depending on your athletic conditioning, run 4-6 days per week, with some level of cross training (non-impact exercise) for one or two of those non-running days. Use one day per week as pure rest - no running - no crosstraining. 

     

    Most of the HM training programs are in the 8 to 10 week range, but you can repeat a series of weeks as it suits you. Just make sure to remember to taper before your HM and that your last long run (like a 12 or 14 miler) should occur no sooner than 2 weeks prior to your HM.

     

    Key thing to remember:  arrive to the starting line healthy.   Failing that, you are not going to have much fun.  Thus the emphasis on building your endurance.

     

    Good luck and let us know how it goes!

    -bill

    http://runningthrutime.blogspot.com

    (what do I know...?  I'm just getting old...)

  • jsimms435 Amateur 15 posts since
    Aug 8, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jun 18, 2014 12:17 PM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    Everyone is different, but it sounds like you might be pushing yourself too hard and need to back off a little.  I usually run 3-4 times a week.  I have found if I do more than 4 days a week I raise my chances of injury. 

  • Leahh3 Rookie 2 posts since
    Jun 12, 2014
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jun 18, 2014 12:32 PM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    I got this really good training guide that has specific activities and distances for each day for 16 weeks! I love how each week is different, but there is always a rest day, two days of cross training, and one day of different workouts (like hills, sprints, farteks, etc.). I definitely think this training plan will work for you because it seems like you vary your types of training just like this guide does. I got this training plan from Team Fight, which has a bunch of marathons, half marathons, triathlons, and other races.

     

    Let me know if you want to learn more about this training plan (and I recommend it). You should also contact Team Fight because they have a lot of other training help and many races, like the Baltimore Running Festival in October. I love being part of this organization because it not only gives me cool gear and training plans, but it also changes the lives of young adults affected by cancer. Let me know if you have any other questions! I hope this helps!

     

    Here's the website just in case! http://ulmanfund.org/teamfight/

  • justamaniac Legend 208 posts since
    May 30, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jun 18, 2014 6:04 PM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    With regards to your 5K times:  don't train like you are racing, train so that you can race.   Another way to put it is, regardless of the distance that you are running, make sure that you can run the distance. Do your speed work (as in intervals once a week), and you if you have the right stuff, you will naturally see your everyday times get a little better every week or so. The point is that as your endurance levels improve, so will your ability to naturally run faster. It will happen without you really realizing it.  Then on race day you will reap the benefit from all the training and you will be surprized at how well you can run.

    But while you are training, if you want to see how fast you can do a 5K distance, find a 5K event some weekend and run it as part of your training program.  The cool part about doing that is that if, for example that day is supposed to be an 8 mile day, run 2 miles before the event, run the event, and then run another 3 miles afterwards - tadaaa... 8 miles and an awesome workout.

     

    Have fun,

    -bill

    http://runningthrutime.blogspot.com

    (what do I know...?  I'm just getting old...)

  • EyupCelik Rookie 1 posts since
    Nov 28, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jun 26, 2014 12:26 PM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    I usually run 40k a week, it sounds may diffucult in the begining but you will get used to this routine very quickly. When I trained for London Marathon, I was doing up to 50 a week and usualy I was runing 10k for 5 days. I never run more than that!

    You can some good information and  running events in this site http://www.sbradvisor.com. It also good source for  Swim Bike Run  events

    Thanks

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jun 27, 2014 11:44 AM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    Re: How much running to do in a week?

    I would say pretty much all of it is heat related (assuming you hydrate well enough post run).  That said, your body will acclimatize and you'll probably be able to run more like a 9:00 pace before too long on an 80 something degree day. 





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jun 27, 2014 7:27 PM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    Re: How much running to do in a week?

    I have seen numbers like 30 seconds per mile slower for every 5 degrees over 60 (maybe it's 10 degrees).  BUT . . . I have never seen that much loss in practice.  And as shipo said, you can acclimate to the increased temps and regain some (but probably not all) of the lost performance.  Honestly, it's not worth worrying too much about it, because when the cooler weather returns, you will easily regain your pace.





    Len

  • NHLA Legend 354 posts since
    Feb 23, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jun 29, 2014 5:25 AM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    I think you should vary your mileage just like you should vary your speed.

    I train seasonaly. At the end of my racing season I will run one last hard race. Rest two weeks with very little running then start new training cycle.

    Start of at 30 mpw. This works out well because I don't run on TM so I miss some running days because of winter weather.

    Ramp up to 50 mpw and run a few 5-10ks.

    Ramp up to 80 mpw for one week then back off to 50 mpw for one week then 80 mpw for two weeks.

    Taper 3 weeks then run my key race of the year. Start overI

     

    If you train in the heat you can run a 5k perty close to full speed.

    Any longer and the heat will get you.

  • shipo Legend 499 posts since
    Aug 9, 2013
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Jul 7, 2014 8:18 AM (in response to JirinPanthosa)
    How much running to do in a week?

    If recovery is a problem, slow down to more like a ten to eleven minute pace; that should also help out your knee issue.  Another thing you might want to consider is finding a dirt trail to run on; pavement is really hard on the body.

     

    A key point to remember, you do not need to train fast to race fast; I'm 57, an easy 30 pounds overweight, and my typical training pace is thirty seconds either side of ten-minutes per mile.  Even still, I just ran a 21:31 5K last Thursday on a very hot and humid day (my shoes and socks were so wet by the finish line they squished like I'd walked through a stream or something).





    Fat old man PRs:

    • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
    • 2-mile: 13:49
    • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
    • 5-Mile: 37:24
    • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
    • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
    • Half Marathon: 1:42:13
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