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9573 Views 90 Replies Latest reply: Jan 10, 2009 9:02 AM by Cruns4fun Go to original post 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 Previous Next
  • diamondcat065 Amateur 62 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    60. Sep 10, 2007 10:45 AM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    When I was new to running I took walk breaks during races. Then I graduated to walking 30 seconds at water stops. Now I run the whole race, unless the heat gets to me - during my last race it was in the 80s and really humid and I ran out of gas so I walked for about 45 seconds and then jogged at a slow pace until I recovered. However, I did notice that I caught up with the ones who passed me during that break.
    Overall, I don't feel there's anything wrong with walk breaks. It's all what works best for you.

    ----



    Don't think about it so much.
    - on package of Dove chocolate

  • Ksabbo Rookie 60 posts since
    Jun 11, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    61. Sep 10, 2007 11:28 AM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    Ok, this issue ALWAYS creates controversy, especially when introduced in a forum other than one dedicated to Galloway's method.

    Regardless, runawayjesse touched on a topic that I've been contemplating lately. Slower marathoners are on the course A LOT longer that many of the faster runners. A slower marathoner can easily take 4 hours or more to do a 20 mile training run. Walking thru parts of the training run may make a lot of sense for this person. A faster marathoner may complete the race in 3.5 hours or less. The faster marathoner would be foolish to have a training run lasting much more than 3 hours. If you can complete a 20 mile training run in approx. 3 hours, you probably don't require walk breaks.

    The point being.... the faster the runner, the less need for walk breaks because...well....um..they're faster  

    I can't remember who said it, but one of the elite marathoners once said that the slower/mid packers were their heros. They paid all due respect to somebody out on the course working very hard for a longer period of time than they did.

    BTW, the tone of my post is lighthearted.  Please no biting.  It would be just my luck to get ahead of a Gallowbiter and have them suddenly take a chomp.  At least make it my rear end And please NO SPITTING.  Gallowspitters are the worst

  • kcarmike Rookie 150 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    62. Sep 11, 2007 1:31 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    Once again, Long Run Nick is the voice of reason.  Really, does it matter if someone uses walk breaks with their running?  Most likely, the elites started that way (of course, they were 10 years old!).  I am training for a marathon using the run/walk method.  My goal is to finish, not be bussed off the course. 

    So, Willamona and others, I will stay out of your way. I am figuring you are starting way ahead of me so I wouldn't be of any bother to you anyway. I am sorry you feel that way about those not as fast as you and those going for personal accomplishment, not major time goals. I am running a marthon only to prove to myself I have the mental fortitude to get through anything. You may finish much sooner than me but I will be smiling all the way. Okay, maybe not ALL the way but I will try for at least half!!

    Thanks again LRNick!!! You rock!

    Kris

  • obsessor Rookie 473 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    63. Sep 11, 2007 2:08 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    I have no problem coming to a dead stop on a long run (or walking) in order to slug down a quart of water or sports drink.  In fact, I suppose on hot days I might be doing that for one minute out of every 20 or 30 minutes.  I have not found that this has a negative effect on my race times.  Of course, I do not walk at all, not even through the water stops, during a marathon.  I have never understood how that claim could be made, that planning in walk breaks could make you faster.  Possibly for people completing a marathon in over 4h, 30min.??

    Let's see... if I were to walk one minute out of every 20 minutes during a race. Let's say my marathon pace is 5.75 min/mile. A brisk walk would be 15 min/mile, for me. (very quick, for me) In a "normal" marathon, I'd cover 20/5.75=3.478 miles every 20 minutes.

    Now we will take the walking break method.  In one minute of walking I'd cover 1/15th of a mile ~ 0.067.  That means I have to make up 3.411 miles in the remaining 19 minutes in order to even equal, much less exceed, the "normal method."  19/3.411 = 5.569 = 5:34 / mi.  I don't see how these little walking breaks would give me the sudden power to knock down the pace 11 sec/mile, much less faster.  I'd say it's a struggle to increase my pace by 2 seconds a mile, when running the marathon.

  • dg12002 Expert 614 posts since
    Aug 26, 2003
    Currently Being Moderated
    64. Sep 11, 2007 2:55 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    quote:


    Originally posted by kcarmike:



    I am sorry you feel that way about those not as fast as you


     



    She forgets that she used to be slow and got snooty for some apparent, elitist (arrogant) reason.

    Someonoe wrote this phrase that if understood would stop all the stupid arguing from immature whiners:

    The point being.... the faster the runner, the less need for walk breaks because...well....um..they're faster

  • tox-prof Rookie 78 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    65. Sep 11, 2007 3:14 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    quote:


    Originally posted by Nobby:

    A-ha! That is my point. I think your legs get stiffen up because you slow blood supply to the muscles. Plus your heart would have to work extra hard to get the beat up again once you start running. Just my scientifically unsupported observation.


     



    Blood flow would likely only drop significantly if you walked fairly leisurely for several minutes.

    I routinely do both types of runs: 16-20 miles without stopping, and 16-30 miles with walk breaks as determined by how I feel, terrain, eating/drinkng needs, etc. When I do stop, most often I use a break every 6-7 miles to squat down and STRETCH my hip flexors, especially on trail and very hilly runs. Continuous runs for me makes my really 'tight' (like sleeping in the same position for 10 hours)

    Personally, I've found little difference in the overall quality of the runs. I tend to run a bit more evenly on continuous runs, whereas on run/walks I tend to speed up after a walk section.

    My walking pace is ~14-15 minutes/mile, and I make sure my heartrate doesn't drop to low. My sister (an avid ultrarunner) likes to say that walking isn't really a break, just a different type of workout that is slightly easier (although anyone who has tried to powerhike up a steep hill will debate that).

    Just my $0.02.

  • runawayjesse Rookie 538 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    66. Sep 11, 2007 3:36 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    quote:


    Originally posted by willamona:

    LOL The next marathon should be the first one where I am finally fast enough to not deal with the Gallow-walkers. THANK GOODNESS.


     



    So suddenly your better than them because you got faster? I bet it was fine when you were in that pack though right?

    Is their a reason to be so condosending? You don't have to like it but don't think your better than them because they walk.

  • Currently Being Moderated
    67. Sep 11, 2007 3:37 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    I use the walk-breaks in  training for my first marathon at age 61. My long runs are out to 18 miles and I'll stop at 20 to begin my taper. Race is Htfd 10/13. I run the first half walking one minute every ten minutes. Then I run five/walk one min. for the next 5 mi. etc, by the end I'm doing 30 seconds each and dealing wiith as much pain walking as running, but by God I'm going to finish this sucker in the time allotted. (Avg nds to be 13:00 pm), and there won't by no rematch. Could'nt do it without the walks.

    ----



    Mongo

  • roadrunner262310 Rookie 26 posts since
    Jul 24, 2005
    Currently Being Moderated
    68. Sep 11, 2007 3:46 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    If need to walk than walk but do not expect to set a new PR using this method.

  • obsessor Rookie 473 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    69. Sep 11, 2007 4:15 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    quote:


    Originally posted by runawayjesse:

    So suddenly your better than them because you got faster? I bet it was fine when you were in that pack though right?

    Is their a reason to be so condosending? You don't have to like it but don't think your better than them because they walk.


     



    there

    you're

    (She's saying she finally does not have to deal with the frustration of having someone stop running right in front of her.  How is this condescending?  For example, it's condescending when people correct your English.  It makes them seem as if they think they are better than you.  Also, in the context of running a marathon race, the faster runners are indeed better than the walkers, just so you know.)

  • RunnersHigh Amateur 259 posts since
    Nov 24, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    70. Sep 11, 2007 4:32 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    I just have to laugh at some of these responses!  Isn't this forum called Basic Training?  Aren’t most of the questions here supposed to be from relatively novice runners?  Why can’t the more experienced runners give simple, applicable responses geared toward this level of runner?   We've got one guy breaking down mathematically why it is a bad idea to walk (while it’s been documented that it works at slower paces, he gives an example of a sub 6 minute marathoner???), another who says you can't PR and still others slinging snide comments back and forth.  Unless I am totally wrong, wasn't Galloway's walking premise for those who are relatively new to running marathons that tend to totally blow up the last 6 miles?  Hasn't he shown that many do PR when they take these walking breaks up to about mile 16 or 18 in order to get the proper fluids in them so that they don't severely slow down that last 6 miles?  I mean come on, how off base can you guys go from the original intent of the question?  One answer simply was "I'm a runner".  Wow.

  • obsessor Rookie 473 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    71. Sep 11, 2007 4:52 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    quote:


    Originally posted by RunnersHigh43:

    I just have to laugh at some of these responses! Isn't this forum called Basic Training? Aren’t most of the questions here supposed to be from relatively novice runners? Why can’t the more experienced runners give simple, applicable responses geared toward this level of runner? We've got one guy breaking down mathematically why it is a bad idea to walk (while it’s been documented that it works at slower paces, he gives an example of a sub 6 minute marathoner???), another who says you can't PR and still others slinging snide comments back and forth. Unless I am totally wrong, wasn't Galloway's walking premise for those who are relatively new to running marathons that tend to totally blow up the last 6 miles? Hasn't he shown that many do PR when they take these walking breaks up to about mile 16 or 18 in order to get the proper fluids in them so that they don't severely slow down that last 6 miles? I mean come on, how off base can you guys go from the original intent of the question? One answer simply was "I'm a runner". Wow.


     



    Breaking it down into thousandths of miles clearly indicated a comedic tone, for my part - the paces just happened to be ones I was familiar with. I started by saying, yes, I train with breaks in my long runs for the purpose of hydration, and it's no big deal. When I started running, my pace was about 1/2 the speed of my current MP, so I can say, "I've been there."

    Are you having a tough day?

  • tigger077 Amateur 690 posts since
    Nov 19, 1999
    Currently Being Moderated
    72. Sep 11, 2007 5:10 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    I once did some work to determine energy cost of run/walking vs running.  It is well known that walking requires less energy per unit of distance than running.  Therefore, run/walking a marathon requires less energy than running.  If my memory is not faded too badly I think the energy consumption from run'walking a 4/1 (or was it 5/1?)  is about 95% of the energy consumption for running the entire distance.  For a marathon this is significant, as it allows one to conserve glycogen for about an extra mile or so.  The same would be true for long runs.

  • NYCross Rookie 161 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    73. Sep 11, 2007 9:17 PM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    "I just have to laugh at some of these responses!  Isn't this forum called Basic Training?  Aren’t most of the questions here supposed to be from relatively novice runners?"

    Well I believe that the OP quoted from an article that said "everyone" and "experienced marathoners" would benefit from walk breaks. Just because this is a basic training forum doesn't mean that misinformation should be propagated. The fact is, many experienced runners do not benefit from walk breaks because they've built up their speed and endurance. That amount and intensity of training may not be for everyone, but it doesn't mean that you're going to be the fastest marathoner possible by continuing to walk. If speed is your number one goal, you may want to consider another training plan.

  • kcarmike Rookie 150 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    74. Sep 12, 2007 2:57 AM (in response to qwestman)
    Re: walk breaks on long runs

    I am figuring that no one, or at least most people, do not expect to finish in top positions using a Galloway-based run/walk method.  I sure don't.  Of course, either way this will be a PR for me (it's my first marathon, gotta start somewhere    ).  I think that many "marathoners" now are doing it not for the competition but for the personal glory of knowing we can accomplish such a great feat.  For many of us it is a mental endurance thing as well as a physical one. 

    I am a runner. I do take walk breaks on my longer runs. This is the plan I have. I planned on it before I knew of Galloway. I still run the vast majority of my time/distance. I am keenly aware to move over when transitioning to a walk. As I will be in the back of the pack with the rest of the "Penguins" I am not worried about those looking for public glory.
    See you at the finish line! Leave me some fruit!
    Kris

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