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3320 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Nov 19, 2007 7:15 PM by Guest
asifrunner Rookie 8 posts since
Aug 10, 2006
Currently Being Moderated

Nov 8, 2007 10:56 AM

pilates

I recently was diagnosed with a herniated disc in my lower back.  After having two epidural shots, my doctor recommended that I started doing crunches to strengthened my abdominal muscles.  I decided to start doing pilates and have gone to four sessions so far, and after the fourth session, it seems like my lower back is really sore.  Does anyone know if this is normal?  Now I feel like I just get confused if it is normal soreness, or if I am hurting my back.  Please help!

Thanks!

  • Birdog Amateur 116 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Nov 8, 2007 11:14 AM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    I know of someone who can definitely help. I worry about being accused of spamming for him. So I won't give the link to his site. I'll just tell you to search: Scott Sonnon. He is an olympic class fighter and coach.
    He deals much in injuries. Knows much about rehabilitation and prevention.

    ----



    Ron
    When being chased by a bear...You don't have to outrun the bear. You just have to outrun the other guy.

  • lakerunr Amateur 151 posts since
    Dec 12, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Nov 8, 2007 12:09 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    Hi, I had a similar problem, but it turned out to be degenerated discs and pinched nerves, not herniated (thank goodness). Anyway after PT and finally an MRI to find the real problem, my sports med doc reccommended pilates.

    I took a 6-week course at a "health mall" part of the local hospital system, from a certified instructor. She stressed that Pilates should NOT cause you soreness in the back or neck, and if we felt any strain there to stop or try an alternate method (bent legs vs. straight, a ball under the small of the back, a ball under the neck, etc.). I believe that Pilates has really helped my back problems.

    Are you going to a class with a certified pilates instructor? Have you mentioned the soreness to the instructor? I've talked to others who went to Pilates at a local health club, led by someone who normally does aerobics. This person was not concerned with proper breathing/form or protecting the neck and back. They had similar problems. If it's making your back sore, I would stop.



    ----



    - Larry -
    Next: Boston '08
    My Profile[/URL" target="_blank">

  • melistic Amateur 777 posts since
    Oct 11, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Nov 8, 2007 9:15 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    pilates is great!
    That being said if you are not doing an equal amt of back work you could be doing more damage.
    At your next pilates class have the teach double check your pelvic tilt. Start there and make sure you are doing that correctly. With weak abs it is very hard to hold the proper position throughout an entire pilates class. I could tell you but it would be much easier to have the instructer have eyes on you to make sure you are doing it correct.
    Some very simple things that will help would be superman's and planks and back extentions. Again making sure your pelvic tilt is held throughout or that disc will get worse. Doing nothing will make it worse much faster however.
    Go and have them look at your tilt, assuming you can hold that, if you have any ?'s about supermans, extentions or planks come on back. Doing any of these without proper alignment will hurt. Istall is correct however if you are feeling more strain while in class that's not good. Although that usually relates to the neck. if you have pain the neck refocus the abs and/or lay down your head.

    All that being said, your back is injured, as in any rehab it will be sore. it will hurt as it gets stronger, trust me in that that is temporary. Just as in when you started running. you were sore on your way to getting stronger. right?
    I had very severe back injuries several years ago. I wholeheartedly believe without pilates/ yoga/ strength training I would not be standing straight today

    *hi-jack Birdog that's the 3 or 4th post I've seen you link this guy in the last half hour of reading. Either it's you...Or he's worked miracles for you. If it's you and you're looking for business that's not what this site's about. If he's helped you please share what you've learned so others can benifit from the knowledge

  • Birdog Amateur 116 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Nov 9, 2007 12:54 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    quote:


    Originally posted by melistic:


    *hi-jack Birdog that's the 3 or 4th post I've seen you link this guy in the last half hour of reading. Either it's you...Or he's worked miracles for you. If it's you and you're looking for business that's not what this site's about. If he's helped you please share what you've learned so others can benifit from the knowledge


     



    Be careful melistic. I am not the Professional Trainer, with a business link on her profile, who just scanned a bunch of injury threads in the last half hour.
    I already answered your questions in other threads. I don't need to elaborate on that site. It speaks for itself.



    ----



    Ron
    When being chased by a bear...You don't have to outrun the bear. You just have to outrun the other guy.

  • melistic Amateur 777 posts since
    Oct 11, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Nov 9, 2007 8:22 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    I didn't say "I'm a CPT; go to my site"

    I offered actual solutions to disc issues !http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|src=http://www.coolrunning.com/forums/biggrin.gif|border=0!


    quote:


    Originally posted by Birdog:

    Be careful melistic. I am not the Professional Trainer, with a business link on her profile, who just scanned a bunch of injury threads in the last half hour.
    I already answered your questions in other threads. I don't need to elaborate on that site. It speaks for itself.


     

     

  • Currently Being Moderated
    6. Nov 13, 2007 8:28 AM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    Last year I was training for the Chi-town marathon and decided to up the ante on my strength training. The year before, I'd done some basic pilates and a friend took me to his personal gyrotonics trainer a few times. I loved it!! So I got a 10-session package and asked the trainer to kill me. So every time I came out of there, my legs were screaming. I was doing stuff on the reformer and other pilates machines that were incredibly intense. I had trouble running after, or even a few days after. But I figured it was what I needed because I am awful at hills and wanted to get an edge (despite Chicago having no hills, I was trying to strengthen a weakness). Well I ended up being so tight that my stride changed and I hurt my back pretty bad a month before the marathon. Needless to say I didn't have a great run, though my PT got me to a point where I could stand upright and continue running after about a week. It was miserable. But I do enjoy the basic pilates, and even the gyrotonics, but I would go easier if I had to do it over again.

  • Currently Being Moderated
    8. Nov 19, 2007 3:23 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    You never want to feel pain in your lower back during or after a pilates session.  Never, ever.  What is probably happening is that you are losing  proper form because your range of motion is too great in a particular exercise  right now as you are new to the practice.  Your instructor should definitely be able to help you modify.  Please make sure that he or she is certified- there are too many non-qualified instructors teaching exercises that could hurt somebody even with a healthy spine.  I am currently training two runners in pilates and Gyrotonic (TM) for the Olympic trials in April and am a runner myself, so I definitely know the benefits of the practice for runners.  I have also rehabilitated many lumbar spines and know that it is a long, hard road.  One of the hard things for athletes is that pilates takes a long time to learn and even longer to master.  The post above made me chuckle as my fittest athletes always come in asking "to be killed" to which I will offer some challenging exercises in order that they get what they are paying for, however, I sprinkle in the pilates principles and eventually they have all come around to knowing that pilates is a very different animal and the more you learn and do, the harder even the simplest movements become when done correctly.  As runners, we are very fit people looking for a workout that we can feel right away.  We almost have to back off in order to properly learn pilates and feel its benefits and sometimes it is this letting go that is the hardest.  Best of luck- do keep up with the pilates, a talented teacher will help you to be at your best sooner than you think.

  • Currently Being Moderated
    9. Nov 19, 2007 7:15 PM (in response to asifrunner)
    Re: pilates

    quote:


    Originally posted by asifrunner:

    I recently was diagnosed with a herniated disc in my lower back. After having two epidural shots, my doctor recommended that I started doing crunches to strengthened my abdominal muscles. I decided to start doing pilates and have gone to four sessions so far, and after the fourth session, it seems like my lower back is really sore. Does anyone know if this is normal? Now I feel like I just get confused if it is normal soreness, or if I am hurting my back. Please help!

    Thanks!


     



    asifrunner,
    Some questions...did your doctor reccomend pilates? What type of pilates are you doing, mat or reformer? Is a group setting, and if it is, how many people are in there? Did you inform your instructor of your injury? Did they ask for a physicians release before you participated? Is your instructor certified through a REPUTABLE organization? Most group ex pilates instructors are not classically trained-they took a 1-2 day workshop at most for the mat, and most personal trainers are not certified physical therapists/ exercise physiologists/physicians. If you're rehabbing an injury and you've got pain when you do pilates, stop! Ask your dr first if pilates is what was meant by 'crunches', <not going thereand then ask for a specific set of exercises to strengthen your abdominals. If pilates is given the ok by doc, get a release, then make sure you see a practitioner in a private setting so that you can get the attention you need.

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