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2126 Views 10 Replies Latest reply: Jun 14, 2007 9:28 PM by eugenecub RSS
csarinana75 Rookie 2 posts since
Jul 9, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Jun 7, 2007 7:32 AM

First 5k

Hello everyone. I'm a new runner and though I've running for 3 months now I was only doing it on the traedmill. I'm running 3 mi and fast walking uphill for another 2(3-4/week). Since I plan to run a 5k at the end of the month I knew I had to star running outside, Oh My!! I went to a park yesterday where each lap is 1/3 of a mi.... I could barely finish running one lap at a time ... I knew outside is harder than treadmill but I was hoping to run at least 1 mi at a time. It was a little bit discouraging cause I feel I have to start all over again and I just lost 3 months of training....

Anyways I got a training schedule for a 5k, and since I started running to loose weigh, It seems like very little exersice, so my question is Can I still do other thing(elliptical, fast walking) on training days? Or should I do it on rest days?

Thank you for listening, Claudia

  • Muwin Running Rookie 12 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jun 7, 2007 8:45 AM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    Well first off let me congratulate your efforts.  Running any where, on the road or on the treadmill takes commitment and you should never down play your accomplishments. 

      With the change of scenery you will need to change your running.  treadmill work is more consistent, you don't really dictate the pace, the machine does.  But on the road its all you.  At first you will need to re-learn your running habits adjusting them for your new environment, but with three months under your belt the learning curve wont be that bad.  Stay encouraged. 

      Now as for your cross training.  Any good training plan should have those days built in to the plan.  Remember cross training is important, but you should not neglect your rest.

      I have no idea if my rambling helped at all but the best thing I can tell you is to stay motivated and know that all of us (except maybe the top 1%) have gone through the same things you are going through.  We made the transition and so can you.  Keep running.

  • Terry4X4 Community Moderator 207 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jun 7, 2007 10:10 AM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    Claudia, you are NOT alone.  I too was disillusioned by my training on the treadmill.  Last year I began running again after a 15 year hiatus.  I was primarily running on the treadmill.  I ran my first 5K in Dec and was very disappointed in my performance and realized that running on the treadmill is not the same as running on the roads.  Despite my disappointment, I knew I could do better and was motivated to improve.  Lately I've been doing about 80% of my training runs on the roads.

     

    Treadmills are great for training during inclement weather, in winter when the days are shorter, and for tempo runs at pace. 

     

    Fortunately you made this discovery BEFORE your first 5K.  On your running days gradually increase your running with walking breaks in between.  Last year I started from scratch with 5 min of running and 2 min walking until I finished 3 miles.  The next time I did 6 min of running and 2 min walking, each day gradually increasing my running intervals 1 min until I could finish 3 miles without walking.  Since you are not starting from scratch you might try say 10 min of running with 2 min of walking and gauge from there.  It does eventually get easier.

     

    If you are doing 3 mile runs then I don't think it would hurt to do some cross training on the same day.  Once you start increasing your mileage then I'd recommend rest and/or cross training on your off days. 

     

    Good luck and let us know you progress.

  • jenhirr Legend 314 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Jun 7, 2007 2:05 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    For me personally, it's way harder to run on a treadmill than outside but you do have to pay attention to pacing.  I would be willing to bet that when you are running outside you are running too fast.  Try slowing way down and just try to get into a rhythm that your body feels comfortable with.  (pay no attention to your watch or gps,  just your breathing and your legs.)  Then you can adjust from there.  It sounds like you are consistent which is the key to pretty much everything.  Everybody has a bad run every now and again so try not to focus on that.  I think you will be amazed at how quickly you become more comfortable.  Another thing, when I'm running outside I try to focus on the scenery, especially on hill days.  It helps to distract me and before I know it, I'm done.  I think running is more than just being able to push your body you have to be able to push your brain too.  I count down time, so I always think "It's only 10 more minutes.  I've taken showers longer than that.  I can do ten minutes."  Maybe that's cheesy but it works for me.  Good Luck! Let us know how it goes.

  • smo5246 Legend 204 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jun 7, 2007 5:33 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    I agree with jen, you are probably trying to run too fast.  When you are running with someone else, the talk test is the way to go.  However, when you run by yourself, you will have to talk to yourself.  Hmmm!  So, someone may think you are nuts.  That's what running is about, i.e., it's crazy, but it's fun.  Now here's a good one.  I don't just sing in the shower.  I find myself singing on 20 mile runs.  Some of the best musicians were nuts too.  Keep up the good work, you will improve.  And, lose the treadmill except for icy conditions and snow greater than 2 inches.  Oh, as previously stated, the treadmill is great for winter tempo runs too.  Otherwise, it ain't going to help you run a fast 5k on the roads.  Regards and good luck from the Stick Man

  • yo-sal Pro 260 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Jun 8, 2007 8:05 AM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    I just recently incorporated long slow, "talk test" runs.  I may try singing, but I found that breathing through my nose helps me keep my speed down and also my heart rate.

  • smo5246 Legend 204 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jun 8, 2007 12:19 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    I too have slowed in some of my runs.  One of my friends retired early last month (like I did -- I retired early from my full time job to devote more time to my part-time occupation, i.e, "Runner") and he runs about a minute per mile slower than me on his long runs.  It is amazing how well rested I feel after running with him.  And, of course, my weekly mileage has picked up and I am running my shorter tempo runs and interval sessions faster.  It definitely works.

  • yo-sal Pro 260 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jun 8, 2007 12:31 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    I couldn't be happier to know that - your good fortune at early retirement, of course, but the fact that you too benefit from those long slows. I was sure I'd hate them, but it's just the opposite. I look forward to them, feel great when I'm done, and like you, my speedwork and tempos are much stronger.

  • DonGardinero Amateur 11 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jun 8, 2007 2:54 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    Gald to hear that you are excited and improving already on the roads.  When I started running six months ago, I did the same thing.  I started out running on the treadmill.  After about two months of that, the treadmill broke and I was forced to run outside.  I could not believe how much harder it was.  It was very discouraging but I kept up on it.  One mistake that I made while running every other day outside is that I was trying to beat my previous run time.  I was doing that every single time and I really wasn't getting any faster.  I've run five different 5k's since January and each one has had a slower time than the previous race.  I recently discovered that I've been doing it all wrong.  I printed off one of thsoe training plans from Runnersworld.Com and hopefully I will improve after doing that.  I'm getting excited about running again and I look forward to my three races coming up.  Good luck to you and keep running.

  • eugenecub Amateur 9 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jun 14, 2007 9:28 PM (in response to csarinana75)
    Re: First 5k

    I don't know if you are still interested in replies to this topic but for what it's worth here's my 2 cents.  For myself I found that nothing beats training on the same surface that intend to run on in a race.  So for example, if I were training for a 5k run on the road (or asphalt) then I would do my training on asphalt.

     

    I trained for my first 10K almost exclusively on a treadmill.  I built my miles up to about 5 then thought, wow, I'm ready as anyone can push themselves to do one more mile.  Well, I finished the 10K pushing myself the entire time.  By the next day my lower back hurt and continually worse for the next week until I couldn't bend to put on my shoes.  The pain was excruciating.  I begged my doc for vicodin and was unable to run for 6 weeks.

     

    Since then I've learned the importance of building a strong core, and cross training.

     

    Congrats and remember to never give up even when everyone including your doctor tells you to!

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