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8309 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: May 28, 2008 2:26 PM by livefree
Trish18 Active.com Staff 457 posts since
Jun 5, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 12, 2008 11:27 AM

Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

To lose weight, sometimes you have to go against conventional wisdom, according to a new study I just read about.

 

Researchers at Purdue University fed one group of rats yogurt sweetened with sugar and gave another group yogurt sweetened with no-calorie saccharin. Both groups were also given regular rat feed.

 

The rats given the diet yogurt ate more feed than those given regular yogurt. And they put on more fat and gained more weight.

 

The theory, translated to humans, is that when you taste something sweet but don't ingest many calories, your body craves more food.

 

Do you think this has some truth to it? Have you experienced something similar?






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  • culinarydoctor Expert 77 posts since
    Oct 31, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Feb 16, 2008 12:20 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    yup, and the truth shall set you free.  Now...

     

     

     

     

     

    Artificial sweeteners.  The first issue is that they are artificial; i.e. not genuine.  And then of course, they are non-nutritive, meaning that they do not provide any caloric energy or trace minerals essential to the human body.  Now, the studies with rats were what originally prompted the FDA to remove saccharin from the market, but the argument was made that the cancerous rats exposed to this artificial sweetener recieved doses significantly higher than the average human consumption.  But the issue is that we are dealing with the very delicate hormonal balance that comprises the human appetite.  Glucagon, insulin, cortisol, histamine, epinephrine, dopamine and the various compounds we have yet to identify are traveling at incredible rates amidst an orchestra of chaos.  So when you start to send your body mixed messages the freeways get jammed.  Your pancreas produces and secretes insulin, the insulin arrives at the sugar "substitute" only to find no work to be done, and so your pancreas becomes confused.  As if the body didn't have enough stress living in the 21st century, we decided to engineer sugar, a basic unit of energy for animals.  Next thing you know everybody is diabetic, thank you very much zea mays, so doctors advise their patients to consume sugar free everything to prevent hyperglycemia.  Unfortunately for the makers of aspartame and sucralose, the human body needs sugar.  Not sucrose (table sugar) either, it just needs carbohydrates to fuel the fight.

     

     

     

     

     

    Moral of the story, eat more fruits and vegetables.  Water is the only diet drink.

     

     

  • livefree Pro 96 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Feb 19, 2008 12:48 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

    There was another eight year study done at the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio that looked specifically at obesity risk from soft drinks. They found that diet soda drinkers were much more likely to become obese than regular soda drinkers. Here is the breakdown:

     

    For regular soft-drink drinkers, the risk of becoming overweight or obese was:

     

     

     

     

     

    • 26 percent for up to 1/2 can each day

     

     

     

    • 30.4 percent for 1/2 to one can each day

     

     

     

    • 32.8 percent for 1 to 2 cans each day

     

     

     

    • 47.2 percent for more than 2 cans each day.

     

    For diet soft-drink drinkers, the risk of becoming overweight or obese was:

     

     

     

     

     

    • 36.5 percent for up to 1/2 can each day

     

     

     

    • 37.5 percent for 1/2 to one can each day

     

     

     

    • 54.5 percent for 1 to 2 cans each day

     

     

     

    • 57.1 percent for more than 2 cans each day.

     

    For each can of diet soft drink consumed each day, a person's risk of obesity went up 41 percent.

     

     

     

    To hear the rest of the story, go to my blog and read the following post:

     

     

    Diet Sodas Make You Fat

  • blackholesun Rookie 19 posts since
    Sep 5, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Feb 19, 2008 11:06 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

    well they have to figure out what soda we can DRINK!

  • Derce Rookie 3 posts since
    Jan 1, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Feb 23, 2008 2:02 PM (in response to blackholesun)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

    I recommend not drinking any soda you will decrease your weight, caffeine level, simple sugars etc. overall you will be healthier without drinking soda at all. Instead try milk, juice (natural juices or low sugar), water, vitamin water. I stopped drinking soda gradually (from caffeine sodas. to caffeine free) eventually stopped drinking it period. I feel so much better, lost weight etc.

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  • culinarydoctor Expert 77 posts since
    Oct 31, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Feb 23, 2008 11:19 PM (in response to Derce)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    Yes, there is the issue of soda specifically, because it is carbonated.  Ferminated drinks like ale, root beer, kombucha and champagne have natural gases, similar to bottled mineral water.  

     

     

    But soda carbonation...?  Heard that it's not good for the joints; could be an old wive's tale, might have something to do with dehydration of synovial fluid.  I have no idea how to make it some scratch, like if you wanted a fresh Pepsi and I'm in the kitchen with a blow torch and 50 ears of corn, I still haven't figured out how to compress CO2 in the lab.

     

     

     

     

     

    As for vitamin water, not all that gliters is gold.  It is however still corn and the vitality of the water is under question.  Pepsi Plus and Coke Max, I would rather eat a Flinstone vitamin.  I'll take a blood orange or a fjui apple over the supplement any day.  Not because of the levels of a specific vitamin compound, but the ability for the body to absorb the foods energy without having to detoxify.

     

     

     

     

     

    Milk is wonderful, as long as its kosher, if you know what I mean.  Otherwise, same issue; body exert energy to flusf

     

     

  • mluben Rookie 3 posts since
    Feb 22, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Feb 24, 2008 1:06 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    well just to straighten things out, any commercial fermented drink like beer and the like are also force carbonated (artificially) unless otherwise stated, because they are pasteurized through boiling which removes the carbonation and alchohol, and they just put it back in later. also its just carbon dioxide and doesn't hurt you at all because it can't enter your blood stream through your stomach, so no it doesn't damage your bones.

     

     

     

    But back on topic, we all know that artificial sweeteners are bad, aside from their obvious links to cancer and addictiveness, they now have all these new studies going for them making them even worse. i can say from personal experience when i was younger and used to drink 4 or 5 diet sodas a day, i had massive cravings for sweets to the point where i would end up eating easily 1000 calories of candy, cakes, etc. in one sitting. my diet got much better and i lost a lot of weight but the last thing i had to give up was the diet sodas which was hard but i don't have the abnormal cravings for sweets i used to, a little chunk of dark chocolate does just fine. my verdict on these studies, hey no big surprise, lets be serious how often has anything artificial turned out to be good for the body.

     

     

  • Derce Rookie 3 posts since
    Jan 1, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Feb 25, 2008 6:26 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    Trish18,

     

     

    Yeah!!!! Keep up the good dietary changes, letting go of the diet soda is not easy, and the gradual decrease is the best way and finding a more healthier alternative. I once read that coke soda can clean off a car battery, thats just how harsh the ingredients are. Well, I'm not sure if this is true, but I read about it.  

     

     

  • mluben Rookie 3 posts since
    Feb 22, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Feb 25, 2008 8:40 PM (in response to Derce)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

    it is hard, those sweeteners are very addictive, but drinking a lot of water is the best thing you can do really. coke can do stuff like that because of its extremely high acidity, it takes 25 glasses of water to balance the ph of a single can of coke.

  • dcfhockeyfoo Rookie 5 posts since
    Jan 31, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Feb 27, 2008 1:08 PM (in response to Trish18)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    Do these studies account for behavioral patters (e.g. people who drink diet soda may have worse nutritional habits or maybe they think they can splurge elsewhere because they drink diet sodas)? Even if there is a biological reason, might there be a way to counter it without cutting out soda completely? I know that many experts say that a diet that completely cuts out treats is not sustainable. My diet dr. pepper in the morning and my diet coke and lunch are 2 things i really look forward to and enjoy as much as i enjoy a plate of french fries, yet it's a vice that has no calories associated with it. i feel like there must be some way to keep my weakness for sweet, carbonated beverages without being doomed to failure in the weight loss or maintenance department.

     

     

  • Derce Rookie 3 posts since
    Jan 1, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Feb 28, 2008 3:53 PM (in response to dcfhockeyfoo)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

    Thats interesting that you should say that because I have heard people make jokes upon seeing someone eating  a lot of fattening foods but, have a diet soda to drink. It is hard to change eating and drinking habits. I agree and all the literature that I have read do say that completely cutting out sweets is not workable. And they do suggest healthy alternatives, so I guess diet soda will be a healthier alternative than regular soda? However, I believe that their are certain foods and drinks that do need to be cut out period, but  thats just my personal opinion.

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  • livefree Pro 96 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Apr 4, 2008 3:05 PM (in response to dcfhockeyfoo)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    dcfhockeyfoo wrote:

    Do these studies account for behavioral patters (e.g. people who drink diet soda may have worse nutritional habits or maybe they think they can splurge elsewhere because they drink diet sodas)? Even if there is a biological reason, might there be a way to counter it without cutting out soda completely? I know that many experts say that a diet that completely cuts out treats is not sustainable. My diet dr. pepper in the morning and my diet coke and lunch are 2 things i really look forward to and enjoy as much as i enjoy a plate of french fries, yet it's a vice that has no calories associated with it. i feel like there must be some way to keep my weakness for sweet, carbonated beverages without being doomed to failure in the weight loss or maintenance department.

    There are people who drink diet soda and lose weight. So, there is no guarantee that it will make you fat. Studies do show that the more you drink, the more you increase your chances. I don't know if they can really prove why that is yet without more study. Another study done at Purdue University was done with rats. The report, published in Behavioral Neuroscience, presents some counterintuitive findings: Animals fed with artificially sweetened yogurt over a two-week period consumed more calories and gained more weight - mostly in the form of fat - than animals eating yogurt flavored with glucose, a natural, high-calorie sweetener. The new study, say the scientists, offers stronger evidence that how we eat may depend on automatic, conditioned responses to food that are beyond our control.

     

    What they mean is that like Pavlov's dog, trained to salivate at the sound of a bell, animals are similarly trained to anticipate lots of calories when they taste something sweet - in nature, sweet foods are usually loaded with calories. When an animal eats a saccharin-flavored food with no calories, however - disrupting the sweetness and calorie link - the animal tends to eat more and gain more weight, the new study shows. The study was even able to document at the physiological level that animals given artificial sweeteners responded differently to their food than those eating high-calorie sweetened foods. The sugar-fed rats, for example, showed the expected uptick in core body temperature at mealtime, corresponding to their anticipation of a bolus of calories that they would need to start burning off - a sort of metabolic revving of the energy engines. The saccharin-fed animals, on the other hand, showed no such rise in temperature. "The animals that had the artificial sweetener appear to have a different anticipatory response," says Susan Swithers, a professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University and a co-author of the study. "They don't anticipate as many calories arriving." The net result is a more sluggish metabolism that stores, rather than burns, incoming excess calories.

     

     

    Swithers stops short of saying that the animals in her study were compelled to overeat to compensate for phantom calories. But she says that the study does suggest artificial sweeteners somehow disrupt the body's ability to regulate incoming calories. "It's still a bit of a mystery why they are overeating, but we definitely have evidence that the animals getting artificially sweetened yogurt end up eating more calories than the ones getting calorically sweetened yogurt."

     

     

     

     

     

  • livefree Pro 96 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. May 28, 2008 2:26 PM (in response to Derce)
    Re: Diet foods and soda may put on more weight

     

    Derce wrote:

    I recommend not drinking any soda you will decrease your weight, caffeine level, simple sugars etc. overall you will be healthier without drinking soda at all. Instead try milk, juice (natural juices or low sugar), water, vitamin water. I stopped drinking soda gradually (from caffeine sodas. to caffeine free) eventually stopped drinking it period. I feel so much better, lost weight etc.

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    The only problem with the vitamin waters is the dubious amounts of vitamins that are in it and the High Fructose Corn Syrup.

     

    High Fructose Corn syrup seems to be in everything these days! Including refined sugar, high

    fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners, the average American

    wolfs down 142 pounds a year, or roughly 2.5 pound a week. That is up

    23 percent in the last 25 years, and is a major factor in soaring rates

    of obesity and diabetes.

     

    High fructose corn syrup is highly processed and consequently it is highly concentrated. This

    is different than the sugar found in an apple. It's a commercial,

    refined sugar. The advantage of HFCS, from the standpoint of food

    manufacturing, is that it's much sweeter than sucrose, it's easier to

    handle during processing, it has a longer shelf life - and it's cheaper

    than sucrose. Americans consume 16 million pounds of it every year.

    That translates to about 60 pounds of fructose per person.

     

     

     

    While it does not spike your blood sugar as much as glucose and

    sucrose, it has shown itself to raise cholesterol levels in studies by

    more than 7% and the bad LDL cholesterols by 11 %.

     

     

     

    Fructose and other sugars contribute to heart disease in yet another

    way. Dietary sugars increase an unnatural tendency toward blood

    clotting. But according to a study published in the Aug. 1, 1990,

    Thrombosis Research, fructose promotes abnormal clotting much more than

    does any other common sugar does.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Vitamin waters are very expensive. There is no way you can be assured

    that the vitamins listed on the label are even in there at all. All of

    that sugar counter acts any health benefit they might provide. My

    suggestion is to take a high quality multivitamin and drink a glass of

    bottled or filtered water. It will be cheaper and you will be getting

    more of what you paid for and getting less of what you don't want.

     

     

     

    Here is a link to an independent study on vitamins and how to choose a quality supplement.

     

     

     

    Comparative Guide To Nutritional Supplements

     

     

     

    If you are still looking for something sweet to drink, there are better

    sugars out there than HFCS, Splenda, Sucralose, Equal and Aspartame.

    Try Stevia, Agave nectar and others. Here is a link.

     

     

     

    Sugar Substitutes and Your Health

     

     

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