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3965 Views 21 Replies Latest reply: Aug 4, 2008 5:52 AM by Kim Jenny RSS 1 2 Previous Next
jenhirr Legend 314 posts since
Jul 9, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Mar 5, 2008 3:07 AM

nutrition help, please

 

My husband is starting a weight-loss program through the local Dr.s office and I want to be supportive and provide the foods required.  I am training for a marathon and some triathlons so I need to make sure I'm getting what I need too.  After listening to the Dr about this weight loss plan and lean body mass, etc...it's pretty clear to me that I need to change some things too.  I train about 12 hours per week and don't "diet", (never have) and I know I don't drink enough water.  I notice I am tired alot.   I know that a lot of what is involved in this program will be beneficial to me and my question is two-fold:  Am I tired because I exercise so much and have a family to take care of or is my food intake lacking the necessary components to support lean body mass and therefore I'm burning my muscle away?  And how do I know without signing up for this program how to tweak it to benefit me?  I can't just use his guidelines, we have way different activity levels and he's eight inches taller than I am with a bigger build.  I know it's hard to give enough info to really be able to provide a comprehensive answer but any tips or advice will help.  Thank you.

 

 

The biggest component to this program is that they are using your bodies natural timing to regulate insulin levels...alot of protein, glycemic index foods, no carbs after    3 pm.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Mar 5, 2008 1:10 PM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

    Do NOT try and follow anything like your husband's plan!  You are exercising two hours a day; you need your carbs.  If you aren't getting enough carbs (or not the right kind), that may be part of why you are so tired (although it may simply be the amount of training you are doing).  Make sure you are getting enough complex carbs (like whole grains) throughout the day and are staying hydrated as well.  Simple carbs can cause insulin spikes and may be why you are feeling tired.  Also, make sure you are getting a fair amount of protein (along with plenty of carbs) right after your workouts.  You need this to refuel and rebuild your muscles or you will break down, especially at the rate you are working out.

    Here are some of my favorite articles:

    http://www.runwashington.com/features/nutrmetab07.html

    http://www.trailrunnermag.com/article.php?id=1&cat=1

    http://www.trailrunnermag.com/article.php?id=12&cat=1

    http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-242-301--10200-0,00.html

    http://www.runningtimes.com/rt/articles/category/?id=106 (links to a series of nutrition articles from Running Times)

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Mar 6, 2008 5:46 AM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

    I hate to say this, but you need to eat carbs throughout the day.  Carbs are your body's fuel; nothing else provides energy in the same way.  Protein and fats are important, but they have different roles.  If you stop taking in carbs in the afternoon you'll likely run out of energy by the end of the day and you will not have enough energy for a good morning workout (it takes your body a few hours to digest your breakfast).  If you are working out in the afternoon or evening it is even more important that you take in carbs and protein right after in order to replenish your muscles' supplies.

    As for the kids, I struggle with the same issues.  I try and offer fruit (like apple slices) instead of cookies because we really are helping to establish their adult eating habits.  My older daughter would rather eat carrots than almost anything else!  My youngest is not as interested in the healthy stuff; she always asks in an accusing voice, "Did you put whole wheat in these waffles?"

    And don't worry about your lean muscle mass, I guarantee you are doing well in that area.

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Mar 6, 2008 8:56 AM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please
    jenhirr wrote:

     

    Hey, what's with all the high fructose corn syrup in whole wheat bread?  Am I going to have to start making my own?

    Don't get me started on the evil that is high fructose corn syrup.  While it's almost impossible to completely avoid it in a "normal" diet (more power to those who can stick with "alternative" diets), it really is important to do as much as you can to reduce your intake.  I am constantly reading labels in order to find products that don't have high fructose corn syrup.  (I think some of the folks at my church think I'm a little neurotic when I pick up a jar of apple sauce during a pot luck and start grumbling as I read the ingredients.  Apple sauce is naturally sweet so why do manufacturers feel the need to add large amounts of high fructose corn syrup?)  You may have to shop around to find a good brand of bread that you like.  Of course, baking your own is a great option which teaches the kids that food doesn't actually come from a grocery store and it makes the whole house smell awesome (best to be done baking well before 3pm in your house ).  There are also lots of great things you can add to homemade breads to make them even healthier (use olive oil, add flaxseed or wheat germ, etc.).  If you have the time, go for it!

  • saraallent Active.com Staff 1,094 posts since
    Oct 2, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Mar 6, 2008 9:33 AM (in response to Jay Silvio)
    Re: nutrition help, please

    Jay is right on. I also wanted to add this video from Dave Scott that I think is pretty good. Dave shares an easy way to determine how much you should be consuming prior to exercise.

     

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Mar 7, 2008 7:22 AM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please
    jenhirr wrote:

    >I train about 12 hours per week and don't "diet", (never have) and I know I don't drink enough water.  I notice I am tired alot.

    Toby just started a new thread based on an article you may want to read.

    Check it out:

    http://community.active.com/thread/42153?tstart=0

  • Sipat Rookie 1 posts since
    Jan 8, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Mar 7, 2008 8:38 AM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

     

    Hi Jenn,

     

     

    I never follow my husband plan especially his running plan, since I'm a much slower runner than him and not at all at his lean body mass yet. I do have a running plan my husband did work out for me. We both try to follow the same nutrient plan, what makes it easier is that we put everything on a spreadsheet. I like you, have a busy schedule with work, home, kids, home embroidery business and a schedule of running anywhere from 20-30 miles a week. I'm training for my first long distance which is a 21-mile walk/run in Big Sur, CA. I've only finish my first two 1/2 marathon and thought I take this one before I try a full marathon. I'm not a previous runner either. So I learn as I progress.

     

     

    I find that I do need to prepare for my long run and refuel especially after my long runs. Try to keep a food log along with your running log. This helps me especially to know why I still feel tired and the types of foods that I've eaten previously. Also you will learn to change and think about what you are eating when you write it down. Believe me I look at my list and don't believe I've eaten that stuff weeks before.  It helps you to become healthier eater.  Try keeping it on your desktop and opening it up every time you visit your computer it will soon become your habit. We also been using Mona Vie as an additional source of superfood for us.

     

     

    Felicia

     

     

     

     

     

  • aswatson Amateur 25 posts since
    Jun 9, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jun 9, 2008 2:06 PM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

    hi jen, I can offer you some products that changed the way that I feel. these products are backed by the Dr. that invented IV nutrtion.they have more unpaid endorsres than any nutritioin company . www.humanvitamins.com is my site & fell free to check the products out.

  • livefree Pro 96 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jul 2, 2008 11:58 PM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

     

    Jay is right. You need carbs throughout your day as an athlete. Although your husbands plan might be ok for someone that is not involved in an active lifestyle, you need something different. Check out the Healthy For Life program for serious and competitive athletes. The regular program is good too. They both advocate a low glycemic lifestyle but advise you to eat small meals throughout the day that have a balance of protein, fat and good low-glycemic carbohydrates throughout your day. The program teaches you how to eat in a healthy way and exercise  with fat loss as a side benefit. It is educational as well as motivational. Diets don't work! Click on the following link to find out why:

     

     

    Why Diets Fail

     

     

  • Nancy Clark RD CSSD Community Moderator 63 posts since
    Jul 8, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jul 8, 2008 9:40 AM (in response to jenhirr)
    Re: nutrition help, please

     

    My clients who report being 'tired all the time' tend to undereat by day. What they describe as "tired" is actually "hunger". So, I suggest you look at when you eat, and front-load your calories to provide more energy during the active part of your day.

     

     

    As for carbs, yes, you do need them to support your running. The chapter on how to lose weight and have energy to exericse in my Sports Nutrition Guidebook (2008) offers helpful information to sort out the carb confusion.

     

    But more than read a book, I highly recommend you (and your husband) get personalized nutrition advice from a sports dietitian. You can find a local expert uring the referral network at www.SCANdpg.org. The "one diet fits all" path generally leads to discontent and blown diets.

    Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

     

     

    Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics

     

     





    Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

    Sports nutrition counselor and food/weight coach

    Author, Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

    www.nancyclarkrd.com

  • Kim Jenny Rookie 5 posts since
    Nov 5, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Jul 18, 2008 12:11 PM (in response to Nancy Clark RD CSSD)
    Re: nutrition help, please

     

    This whole carbs discussion caught my eye.  This is an issue I struggle with constantly.  I run 2-3 marathons per year.  Currently I'm training for a marathon and my first few triathlons, averaging ~12 hours per week as well.  My problem is that I can't eat carbs.  Not a weight issue.  I have IBS (I know ,TMI).  Carbs cause considerable discomfort.  I generally eat protein and some vegetables and fruits.  I do try to have a whole grain cereal or a Kashi bar for breakfast and sometimes I'll have a whole grain bagel, but pasta and 'taters are out of the question.  I generally don't do well with any "white" or processed foods and can only eat other carbs in very limited quantities.  I definitely pay the price for consuming Gu during the marathons.  Does anyone have any  suggestions?  How does one carb load without eating carbs?

     

     

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    13. Jul 18, 2008 4:09 PM (in response to Kim Jenny)
    Re: nutrition help, please
    Kim Jenny wrote:

    How does one carb load without eating carbs?

    Kim,

    Welcome to active.com!  You can carbo-load by eating many of the foods you have already mentioned: whole grains, fruit, and Kashi bars (I'm a huge fan of their Go-Lean Crunch cereal) all contain plenty of carbohydrates.  In fact, for long term carbo-loading these complex carbs are much better than simple carbohydrates found in sugar, white flour/rice, etc.  I just finished a nice dinner of whole grain pasta.  If you are looking for something to use during runs/races, you might want to try less processed bars/gels/drinks like those made by Clif. http://www.clifbar.com/food/find_compare/

    I hope this helps.  Please let us know if you have any other questions or comments.

    Good luck and happy running!

    Jay

  • Nancy Clark RD CSSD Community Moderator 63 posts since
    Jul 8, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Jul 18, 2008 6:20 PM (in response to Kim Jenny)
    Re: nutrition help, please

    Hi Kim,

    FYI -- Fruits and vegetables are carbs, so you can eat lots of sweet potato, banana, corn, beans, etc. and get carbs. You can also carb-load on rice, just like Asian runners do.

     

    You might want to talk with your MD about getting tested for celiac / gluten intolerance. Many people with IBS are actually gluten intolerant. You can get more info at www.celiac.org.

     

    Regards,

     

    Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD





    Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

    Sports nutrition counselor and food/weight coach

    Author, Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook

    www.nancyclarkrd.com

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