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2788 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: Feb 20, 2007 8:00 AM by yo-sal RSS
yo-sal Pro 260 posts since
Jul 9, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Feb 15, 2007 7:45 AM

heart rate

I don't know what to make of this: my friend and i were running on treadmills at a gym. She was cruising at a 9 min/mile and I at 9:30 - I'm 50-something and she's about 15 years younger. Her heart rate reached 145 and stayed there. Mine went up, up, to 177 bpm. We both ran for an hour. The only difference i could see was that she was able to carry on conversations with other gym rats, while i was thinking, oh please don't talk to me.  I've been running about 10 years and if i keep my heart rate down to the 140's, I'm barely jogging. But is this something i should seriously work on?   Does this come with more years of running? My max HR is 185. Anybody else run like I do?

  • Joe_h1 Community Moderator 1,833 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Feb 15, 2007 8:08 AM (in response to yo-sal)
    what the purpose of you run?

    comparing HR for two people doesn't work so don't even bother.  if was supposed to be an aerobic workout you were going too hard (177/185 = 96%) if it was a threshold workout I guess it was about right





    goals for 2011:

    break 19minutes for 5k

    break 2:42 for olympic triathlon probably Anthracite olympic

    break 3:16 for marathon ( a long shot but it's fun putting yourself out there)

  • Joe_h1 Community Moderator 1,833 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Feb 15, 2007 8:34 AM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate




    goals for 2011:

    break 19minutes for 5k

    break 2:42 for olympic triathlon probably Anthracite olympic

    break 3:16 for marathon ( a long shot but it's fun putting yourself out there)

  • matlombardi Pro 93 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Feb 15, 2007 12:38 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    Everybody is different. I am sure those elite marathon guys probably run about 5:30 at 145bpm. It does not sound like you need to work on anything, but you can if you want to.

     

    Running more years will not help. You need to make changes to your training and possibly your form. If you are serious about getting faster you should do a lot of reading and maybe seek out a coach.

     

    You probably have a little more in you, but your numbers are fine and you have been running for ten years. S'all good.

     

    mat

  • smo5246 Legend 204 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Feb 15, 2007 3:45 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    One thing that I observed is that you said your max heart rate is 185.  I don't know how you measured that, but I believe the rule of thumb for max training heart rate is 220 minus your age.  At 50, that would put you at 170.  So, if you were running at 177, you were running faster than your max training heart rate.  You shouldn't even be running your 400s that fast.  At least that is the general thinking.  Myself, I can run a tempo run continuously for 5 miles or more at what is considered my max training heart rate (160).  Also, I notice that when I start out my 400s, I am in the mid 150s.  After 7 or 8 of them, I am approaching 170. I don't seem to be killing myself when I do them. I often wondered if my max training heart rate is higher than 220 minus my age.

  • Joe_h1 Community Moderator 1,833 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Feb 16, 2007 6:08 AM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    the formula is a generic way to guess at max aerobic HR. best way to know for sure is to do field tests because your max HR # is different for each person and changes as you become more fit.  I believe the field test Joel Friel uses in Triathlete training bible is a 30 min time trial and the Avg Hr for the last 20 minutes is your Lactate Threshold.  think the cruciblefitness.com article linked above has some tests too.





    goals for 2011:

    break 19minutes for 5k

    break 2:42 for olympic triathlon probably Anthracite olympic

    break 3:16 for marathon ( a long shot but it's fun putting yourself out there)

  • matlombardi Pro 93 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Feb 16, 2007 12:27 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    You are correct about peoples max HR. They can vary up and down from the 220 minus formula by 10 percent. The only way to truly determine max HR is to get a series of tests run by a professional.

     

    I think a better way to judge your HR is through the conversation test. If you can carry on a conversation you are aerobic. If you are dying you are anaerobic.

     

    And I imagine that your friend would be avoiding converstion somewhere around 170 plus also. The difference is that she would be sustaining a much faster pace than the 9s she was pacing at 145bpm.

  • smo5246 Legend 204 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Feb 16, 2007 1:03 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    I re-read the original post on this subject and I thought about my tempo runs these days compared to years ago (I'm 60).  I rarely use a heart monitor and usually simply monitor my breathing.  My 5 mile tempo runs these days are in the 38 range.  15 to 20 years ago, I consistently ran around 30 minutes.  I feel like I am breathing as the same effort, and accept that my times are slower.  I suppose there are some 50-60 year old runners who are as fast as they were 10, 15, or 20 years ago, but I don't know any of them.

  • matlombardi Pro 93 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Feb 18, 2007 2:57 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    I have often used nose breathing to limit my pace during training. It is also helpful during the first mile or two of a distance race. Nice catch.

  • TrueIllini Rookie 1 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Feb 19, 2007 9:35 PM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    I started using the Polar HRM for my workout routine. I am 22 years old and my max HR is 198 and resting is 58. The reason I am using the HRM is to lose some stubborn fat around my waist. I can train at 80-90% of my max HR for 15 minutes but I dont think it is helping me burn fat. I was reading an article on Polar's website and it said that the best zone to burn fat is 60-70%. Is this true and have any of you tried this before? Would it be okay for me to train at 80-90% to burn fat and increase my fitness level at the same time?

  • matlombardi Pro 93 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Feb 20, 2007 7:55 AM (in response to yo-sal)
    Re: heart rate

    TrueIllini,

     

    Energy in your body is produced by burning fat and carbohydrates thus producing calories. Calories are a measure for units of energy. It takes about 3 times more units of fat to produce the same amount of energy as carbs.

     

    When you run at a high HR your body requires more energy to work than at a low HR. Since carbs produce more energy and are easier for your body to burn than fat, your body will naturally tend to use carbs instead of fat to produce the necessary calorie level.

     

    The total amount of calories you burn depends on how long and how hard you workout. It comes out to about 100 to 150 calories per mile. Harder runs will use more calories per mile than slow runs.

     

    So, while a 3 mile, high HR workout might burn 450 calories, most of those will come from carbs. A 5 mile, slower run will burn 500 calories, but a higher percentage will come from fat.

     

    As you train, your body will become better at using fat as fuel. For long distance training it becomes a survival technique as most of the fuel from carbs is burned off after about 2 hours of running. A 4 hour marathon would be impossible without your body becoming a more efficient fat burning machine.

     

    That is the gist of why long, slow running is better at burning fat.

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