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6135 Views 17 Replies Latest reply: Jun 14, 2008 6:34 PM by valcamper RSS 1 2 Previous Next
Harriet UK Rookie 6 posts since
Jun 5, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

Jun 5, 2008 4:41 AM

I can't help it, I have to.

I tried this running malarkey one before - i think I got to about week 6 of c25k, but it was so painful for my knees I ended up so I was supposed to walk with a stick.  The doctor did a test for arthritis and ruled that out, then said "don't run then."  which I sulked about for a while and eventually tried to forget about running.  I got a bike and took up cycling instead, which is great, I can cycle for miles and miles no problem, and I've got a 140 mile weekend ride planned for later in the year, and if the weather is nice, I might do 60 tomorrow.  My bike goes everywhere with me - it substituted a cane for a while (a cane?!  I'm only 25!)  not so much anymore - my knees are healing.

 

But I joined a gym recently, and seeing everyone run on the treadmills, whilst I was walking was just too much.  I'm not the fastest or fittest runner in the world, but I can't help but want to run.  Sometimes, I close my eyes and see the path where I run passing me by, and I realise that cycling will never be good enough - A bike will carry me a hundred miles or more, and I don't plan to give that up, but there's nothing like running.

 

I'm back on week 1 of c25k now, 3 years after quitting the first time round..  I know I shouldn't run, but you all know how it is - sometimes, you just can't help but want to.  First time I tried it, I ran for 5 minutes instead of one - I got to the end of a minute and thought "just a little bit more, just a little longer" and I carried on for 5 minutes, walked for 5 and did it again.  I have more self control now - I run for a minute and walk a minute and a half, like a good noob.  It's uncomfortable for my knees, but not painful - yet.  And when I stop running, they stop complaining.

 

I've read that weight-bearing exercise is supposed to help poorly knees, so what happens if I keep working on week one, for as long as it takes for me to do it without any discomfort on my knees (or cripple myself again) Do you think that'll help my knees?

(they sort of feel like I've twisted them very slightly, just to the inside, at the front, bottom and just peeking out from under my kneecap - so I figure strengthening them will help - will it?)

  • pamburrus Pro 136 posts since
    May 14, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jun 5, 2008 5:32 AM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

     

    I'm 27 and first noticed my knee problems when I was 18 - freshman year of college.  It was so bad one morning I coudlnt stand to get out of bed.  They called me in some 800mg ibupropen which seemed to help enought to get me moving  and get me to the infirmary... where they said "It's probably arthritis.  You may want to see a specialist".  Well - being a college student (a broke college student) I didn't see a specialist and just accepted it as bad joints.  I've never been SUPER active.   I played softball and would go walking around campus with my friends for exercise... and then a litle Tae Bo here and there (love me some tae bo) but never really ran "because of my knees". (skip down to the last paragraph if you dont want to read haha)

     

     

    Skip forward about 8 years - I'm now married and hubby is a runner.  I've had bouts of gaining 25lbs then I'll do tae bo / count calories and lose again and signed up for the Breast Cancer 3 Day walk.  Since I've started my traing my knee has been bothering me again.  A couple of weeks ago my husband said "If you are walking as fast as you do every time - try running"  Of course I told him "I CANT I HAVE BAD JOINTS I TOLD YOU".... then one day when I was on my walk, I picked up my feet and started jogging... very slowly... before I knew it I had made it half way around the neighborhood (not quite a mile... 3/4 maybe) and then I was HOOKED.  You have to understand I had NEVER run even CLOSE to a mile in my life.

     

     

    Ok so this story is getting long. I'll try to speed it up.  So my knees were aching even when I wasnt running, but I loved the feeling of "going on a run" - then before I new it I had signed myself up for a 5k.  The course was SUPER flat and I RAN THE WHOLE WAY omg I was SHOCKED.... and on top of that I got 1st place in my age group (It was a small race lol)

     

     

    Well - desperately wanting to keep up my running, and not injure my knees, I made a trip to the specialist.  They did 3 xrays and he basically told me I had Chondromalacia  (aka runner's knee  aka Irritate kneecap)  and to keep taking 800mg of Ibupropen for inflamation - and to do exercises to strengthen my quads.  I've been doing squats (make SURE you do them the right way - your knees should not go over your feet), lunges, stretching, etc.  I cycle to crosstrain.  I got one of those little knee bands you can get ANYWHERE that will take the pressure off your kneecap... and have been taking Cosamin DS (glucosamine and chondroiton) and everything in combination seems to be working for me!!  I can go out and run about 3 miles at a time- and I've only been running a month now.  I read that women especially have problems with their knees because of the positioning of the hips.  They are wider which puts pressure on knees in a different way.  Once my doctor told me I was fine to keep running - it became more of a mind over matter thing.  Also make sure you are "running properly".  dont push off with your feet, try just lifting them up.  Dont lean forward when you run - it will shorten your stride.  Jeff Galloway recommends pretending you are a puppet on a string.

     

     

    Don't give up - GO SLOW and build up your quads.  That should help.  Keep us posted.

     

     





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    My PR's (post kid haha)

    Beat the Street for Little Feet 5k: 26:34

    Big Peach Sizzler 10K: 52:21

    Downhill at Dawn Half Marathon: 1:55:02 (first and only other than one that I ran with a friend to pace her)

    Soldier Marathon: 4:09:16 (first and only so far...)

    Check our our nation-wide running group for moms!

    www.momsrunthistown.com or https://www.facebook.com/momsrunthistown

    Moms RUN This Town (MRTT) is a 'moms only' running club started by moms.... for moms... to support moms in their running endeavors.

    Our goal is to help to keep you motivated no matter where you are in your running - whether starting the c25k program or training for a marathon.

  • teri dacto Pro 177 posts since
    May 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Jun 5, 2008 3:25 PM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

     

    Harriet,

     

     

    I don't know if it could help or not but I am reading book called Chi Running.  The author says he has camps, etc and has been able to take people who have joint pain, etc and transformed them into people who run without injuries.  He talks a lot about using your core and then letting your limbs follow....pretty interesting thus far.  He offers advice in the book on how you can become injury free...he runs those 50 mile races, etc.  Also, are you wearing the right shoes?  Hope you are able to get back into running. 

     

     

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,266 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jun 6, 2008 8:42 AM (in response to teri dacto)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

    All of this is good advice. But one thing I don't see mentioned is shoes (whoops, teri did mention shoes). Get yourself a gait analysis and make sure you are in the right shoes for you. A good running shoe store will do one, running on a treadmill (if they tell you to walk, you want a different store), and possibly make a video so you can be seen in slo-mo. You can also get one professionally from a podiatrist, orthopedist or similar doctor, and some fitness and sports medicine centers.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len





    Len

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jun 7, 2008 11:11 AM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.
    Harriet UK wrote:

    Thanks for all the advice.  My knees are complaining more and more, so I'll decide wether I should carry on on Monday - I had a feeling that me knees hurt because my knees hurt, and it had little to do with running - Still seeing how that goes.

    If you are hurting, you need to take it easy.  Listen to what your body is telling you.  I have found that cross-training (swimming, biking, elliptical training, etc.) is a great way to go when you start feeling these types of pains.  That way you can still exercise, but you reduce the pounding on your legs and minimize injuries.  I hope this helps.  Let us know if you have any other questions or comments.

    Good luck and happy running!

    Jay

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jun 9, 2008 10:15 AM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.
    Harriet UK wrote:

    erm....I may have failed to mention, when I run, the balls of my feet hit the ground first.  

    One of the trainers at the gym pointed it out to me today - I mean, I knew, but it never occurred to me that everyone didn't run like that!  She didn't say wether it was good or bad, just mentioned that it was unusual.

    I also strike on the forefoot rather than the heel like most other runners.  It is unusual, but I've been told it is actually more biomechanically efficient.  The only real issue is that shoe companies don't design shoes with us in mind.  Most shoes have these great designs and technologies for reducing impact on the heel area of the shoe, but if you don't land there it isn't any help at all...

  • MRoz43 Rookie 1 posts since
    Jun 9, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jun 9, 2008 10:16 AM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

     

    Hi Harriet,

     

     

    ultra newb here, however, not without experience in shin pain. I found out some exercises to strengthen my shins so now I feel inspired to begin running and have entered and completed my first 5K! which was quite cool. I was wondering perhaps if your doc could recommend strength building exercises for your knees. Also, I, like you, invested in proper shoes which appears to help a good deal. Good luck. I hope you find your way.

     

     

  • Oscar's MumMum Amateur 36 posts since
    Apr 17, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jun 9, 2008 10:48 AM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

    I'd make sure to keep your doctor involved in any exercise program.  Taking it slow sounds like a good idea.  Make sure to take your days off too.  Even though the C25K has only 3 workouts a week, I really wanted to push through and do 2 weeks worth of the program in one week.  This is not a good idea.  You could try water running to strengthen your legs and get a great cardio workout.  I've heard the elliptical is more gentle on the knees too.  Good shoes built for running and selected by a professional specifically for your feet can ease discomfort too.  If you do go the weight training route, work with a trainer at first to make certain your form is correct.  If you hyper-extend your knees or have your knee out of alignment durning a lift, you'll do so much damage.  GL.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,266 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jun 9, 2008 11:02 AM (in response to Jay Silvio)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

     

    Jay Silvio wrote:
    Harriet UK wrote:

    erm....I may have failed to mention, when I run, the balls of my feet hit the ground first.

    One of the trainers at the gym pointed it out to me today - I mean, I knew, but it never occurred to me that everyone didn't run like that! She didn't say wether it was good or bad, just mentioned that it was unusual.

    I also strike on the forefoot rather than the heel like most other runners. It is unusual, but I've been told it is actually more biomechanically efficient. The only real issue is that shoe companies don't design shoes with us in mind. Most shoes have these great designs and technologies for reducing impact on the heel area of the shoe, but if you don't land there it isn't any help at all...

     

     

     

    Though forefoot striking is supposed to be more biomechanically efficient, my understanding is it can also be harder on the legs, particularly the ankles and knees.  This is because the foot normally absorbs a lot of the impact through pronation, but it happens to a lesser degree with forefoot strikers.  And the number of shoes with good forefoot cushioning is getting "thinner and thinner'.  These days, by the time I get to 16 or 18 miles in a marathon, I feel like I'm running directly on the pavement.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jun 9, 2008 12:10 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.
    lenzlaw wrote:

    >And the number of shoes with good forefoot cushioning is getting "thinner and thinner'.  These days, by the time I get to 16 or 18 miles in a marathon, I feel like I'm running directly on the pavement.

    I actually take my shoes into a repair shop located in the local podiatrist's office and have part of the sole replaced with a more durable material.  If I didn't do this, I'd need new shoes every month!  As is, it's a real good thing I get a discount from Brooks.

  • rolling1977 Amateur 183 posts since
    May 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Jun 9, 2008 12:33 PM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

    I second the motion for Chi Running.   The POSE method ruined my achilles where it attaches to the calf.  It took over a year for me to recover, and I only ran a quarter mile with that method.  I get shivers just typing POSE.  Try Galloway.  It is a good common sense way to keep going with minimal, or no, injury.

  • Jojo_tkc Pro 73 posts since
    Apr 15, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Jun 13, 2008 8:58 PM (in response to Harriet UK)
    Re: I can't help it, I have to.

    *+"the thing is, during the run/walk interval, my knees ache a bit - not pain as such, just discomfort in the usual spot, but on the last rep, the longer I keep running, the less discomfort I feel - today after about 5 minutes, I felt like I could have run all day."

     

     

     

    To be Honest with you mine (knees) did the same thing. I have an old injury in my left knee that I never had looked at by a Dr. It used to get to the point that it felt like it was swollen to the size of a basketball. When I started back running again I started out slow like you described and my knee started feeling the same way you describe, now that I'm running regualarly and varying up during the week with the elliptical and the bicycle my knee really does not bother me that much. Well, definately not everyday like it used to. I would definately suggest having it looked at though just to make sure nothing is REALLY wrong and just to give you the piece of mind.

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