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11062 Views 30 Replies Latest reply: Jun 12, 2008 9:11 PM by Steelers21 RSS 1 2 3 Previous Next
Steelers21 Legend 592 posts since
Apr 8, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

Jun 11, 2008 11:22 AM

Time or distance?

 

Len and E1vis were discussing training runs in another thread, and talked about running for an hour.  E1vis, being a pretty good runner (obviously), noted that he would do 10 miles in that time, while Len (another pretty darn good runner) a little less.

 

 

 

 

 

So my question: Do the posters here run distance?  Time?  A combination?  I have always set my runs for just distance, but I am beginning to think that I need to change my schedule to get better times . . .

 

 

  • MariahAU Legend 227 posts since
    Mar 29, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jun 11, 2008 11:32 AM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    I run for distance unless I have some place to be..My body tries to be lazy and know that if I have an hour to run.. I will run slower.. If I know I have to run 6 miles then I will rush to get it over and tend to run faster...

  • cplmtz0121 We're Not Worthy 2,455 posts since
    Nov 1, 2007
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    2. Jun 11, 2008 11:51 AM (in response to MariahAU)
    Re: Time or distance?

    I think it may be a combination.  In my case, when I first started training for my first couple of marathons, I would run for time so that I could train my body to get used to being running for long periods of time.  Now I train more for distance and shooting to minimize the time it takes me to cover that distance.





    Hard-charging motivating Devil Dog

  • Jay Silvio We're Not Worthy 1,775 posts since
    Jul 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jun 11, 2008 12:03 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    For running, I go by distance whenever I can.  On rare occasions that I'm running while on a vacation or something, I might go out for half an hour and then turn around, but that's about it.  When I'm cross-training, however, I always go by time, even on machines that display the distance.  I wonder why that is...

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,389 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Jun 11, 2008 12:16 PM (in response to cplmtz0121)
    Re: Time or distance?

     

    I always do my runs by distance.  Why?  Because that's the way I learned and it's what makes sense to me.  In terms of race-specific training runs, It may actually make sense.  When you run a race, you run a certain distance, not so many minutes, so it's probably helpful to get used to measuring your run by the distance.  Interval training is probably best done by distance as well.  Other runs are more of a toss-up.  Tempo runs, for instance, are frequently described by time: warm up for 15 minutes, run at a tempo pace for 30 minutes, cooldown for 15 minutes.  Then we translate that into miles: at my 10 minute pace that's a mile and a half warmup and cooldown, and that's 3 and a third miles at my 9 minute tempo pace, for a total of six and a third miles.  The other advantage to running by distance is you know you've done a certain amount of work.  Whether you're having a good day or a bad day, six miles is six miles.   The nice thing about running by time is you don't have to worry about distance or route.  You just go out and run for 45 minutes or an hour.

     

     





    Len

  • DoubleEye Legend 645 posts since
    Feb 4, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Jun 11, 2008 12:20 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    Always for distance. Sometimes distance + time (pace), but never just "time". Happy trails!

  • E1vis Pro 152 posts since
    May 20, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Jun 11, 2008 12:33 PM (in response to DoubleEye)
    Re: Time or distance?

    I like to do both.  I like to run for time just so as people state, I can get used to running for that period of time.  I do a lot of tempo, interval training that after a while I can see in my 'time based' runs by getting further with less fatigue and obviously a slightly quicker pace.  Running for time also makes it easy for me to get true easy paced runs in.  Once i set a distance, i get preoccupied with splits and how fast or slow i am going.

     

     

    There's no one way for sure, but many friends i have do a lot of training based on time and not just distance...

  • Andrew... Legend 273 posts since
    Jan 24, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jun 11, 2008 12:35 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

     

    Marathons are measured in distance, not time.   Ergo, I run for distance

     

     

    Happy Running!

     

     

  • RunnerWags Legend 624 posts since
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jun 11, 2008 1:45 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

     

    I run for distance as long as I have enough time.  If I have more time, I'll go for more distance.

     

     

    I can also use obfuscate in a sentence.  Hope that helps.

     

     

  • E1vis Pro 152 posts since
    May 20, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jun 11, 2008 2:10 PM (in response to RunnerWags)
    Re: Time or distance?

    FWIW (number 2)

     

     

     

     

    The two most important days in this training program are the workout that we do when we meet together & the long run. If on certain weeks you find that you are unable to fit the other runs in you will be OK if you complete the workouts & long run. Why is the long run so important? It is the foundation of what will become your base. Think of this training program as a house. In order to build a house you must have the foundation balanced & secure. The wider base you construct, the larger the house that you are able to build. Training for the marathon is no different. We will begin to add time to your long run consistently each week in order to gradually increase the amount of time that you are on your feet. There are a number of important rules to follow with regard to the long run.

     

    Long Run Rule #1: Keep it conversational. You should be running easy enough to carry on a conversation comfortably. This means that you are breathing at an easy rate, your body is relaxed & comfortable (especially for the first two-thirds of the long run), you are taking water breaks wherever necessary & are generally out for an extended good time. The long run itself is enough stress on your body that you will not need to run fast. Running fast is actually counterproductive, especially early on.

     

    Long Run Rule #2: Run for time, not distance. Our goal with the long run is to increase the amount of time spent on your legs. For each runner the distance that they will cover in the prescribed time will be different & is essentially unimportant. Stress is a function of time spent doing an activity; so slower runners are often stressed more, even when completing lower mileage than their faster counterparts. A slower runner will take 50% more steps, even if they cover the same distance. For this reason, to avoid overtraining & injury, a slower runner may have to run less total mileage than a faster runner.

     

    Long Run Rule #3: Be gradual. Remember the 10% rule. Our entire training program is focused upon gradually increasing your long run mileage & weekly mileage. The way we control this increase is to only increase the total distance covered each week by 10%. Scientific studies & years of personal trial & error have shown that the human body can adapt to any stress if we give it adequate time. In a 12-week program we have the perfect amount of time to get runners over the distance that you will cover in the race (6.2 miles.)

     

    Long Run Rule #4: Pamper yourself. After a long run your muscles have shortened significantly. The limited range of motion that you use, due to the slower speed & duration that you are running, cause the muscles throughout your body, but especially the hamstrings & calves, to become very tight & stiff. For this reason, you should stretch slowly but for an extended period of time. If you have added massage to your recovery regimen then this is a great day to get a massage. Eat what you crave (you will be HUNGRY after these long runs) & drink copious amounts of water.

     

    Long Run Rule #5: Drink before you are thirsty. By the time that you are thirsty on a long run, you are already significantly dehydrated. Even if it is a cold, rainy day your body still needs to take frequent water breaks. How often should you stop for water? Once every 30 minutes is the bare minimum & once every 20 minutes is ideal. I recommend that everyone drink a gallon of water a day for your body to run efficiently. After your run, drink an electrolyte replacement fluid that has at least 50 grams of carbohydrates to aid in recovery & replenishment.

     

    Long Run Rule #6: Cautiously run with a friend. Given the amount of time that you are out on the trail or roads running these long runs it can get boring rather quickly. For this reason it makes it a lot easier to run with a friend. This is an excellent thing as long as your friend runs the same pace that you do. If he or she runs faster than you do you may be asking for trouble. Even a pace difference of 10-15 seconds per miles can be the difference between running conversationally & struggling. Your long runs will wear you down & possibly cause an injury if you are not vigilant about staying in your comfort zone.

     

    Long Run Rule #7: Have a great time. If it ain't fun, it ain't gonna happen. Week in, week out the long run is a consistent feature of our training program. In order for you to remain motivated & consistent, the long runs need to be fun.

     

    Armed with these rules, you will be more prepared to handle the aches & pains that are associated with the long run. Remember that the critical aspects of this training program are the long runs & organized workouts. There is one more benefit associated with the long run that has passed into the realm of myth & legend: the Runner's High. The only way you will ever experience this disembodied state is to keep consistent with your long run.

     

    If you have any questions or comments please feel free to contact Steve Sisson, Director of Rogue Training Systems at steve@roguerunning.com

    >

  • Immer treu We're Not Worthy 5,202 posts since
    Jan 23, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Jun 11, 2008 3:21 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    As Elvis accelerates, time as measured by his watch slows down compared to that of an observer or official "on course," making him think he is even faster than he is.  In some reference frames, his shape may be distorted as well.

  • dutch omi We're Not Worthy 5,642 posts since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    12. Jun 11, 2008 4:50 PM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    Always distance, however long or short it takes, and in my case it takes time.

  • Courir26 We're Not Worthy 1,968 posts since
    Feb 4, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Jun 12, 2008 5:57 AM (in response to Steelers21)
    Re: Time or distance?

    The vast majority of the time, I run for distance. Every once in a while, I'll throw in a "time" run just for the heck of it. No real difference though, whatever works for you is fine.

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