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10437 Views 36 Replies Latest reply: Sep 10, 2008 3:28 PM by mbottos RSS Go to original post 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • thefirecat Community Moderator 2,779 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    15. Sep 8, 2008 2:57 PM (in response to Redward)
    Re: Situation
    Redward wrote:

     

    Okay, I'm going to be the contrarian. I don't think those are shin splints because shin splints don't go away after a couple of miles.  I've had shin splints, and I also get the sore shins in the early miles of a marathon similar to what you describe.  Sometimes it gets so bad that I wonder whether I can continue, but invariably around mile 7 I wake up and realize that the pain went away a couple of miles back and I didn't notice it.

     

     

    How bad were your shin splints, Ed? In the early stages, they often DO go away the way you've been describing, but in the later more severe stages, they....don't. Presumably you do all sorts of shin stretches before long runs to minimize the agony of the first 7 miles?

     

     

    You can do a bunch of exercises and both may go away, or you can quit worrying about them both, do nothing, and chances are they will still go away.

     

     

    Yeah, I ignored mine. And they became stress fractures. Yay bone trauma.  I knew I had to do something about mine when it hurt so bad I yarfed afterwards. Fun times at the gym that day. I have heard of other people running through them, though, and having them go away.





    God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    16. Sep 8, 2008 4:35 PM (in response to Immer treu)
    Re: Situation

     

    Immer treu wrote:

    If it's FRONT of the shin pain plus side stitching, consider shortening your stride just a little bit........

     

     

     

     

    Maybe why mine only bothered me on faster paced runs, where my stride is longer.

     

     





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    17. Sep 8, 2008 4:42 PM (in response to thefirecat)
    Re: Situation

     

    thefirecat wrote:
    Redward wrote:

    . . . You can do a bunch of exercises and both may go away, or you can quit worrying about them both, do nothing, and chances are they will still go away.Yeah, I ignored mine. And they became stress fractures. Yay bone trauma. I knew I had to do something about mine when it hurt so bad I yarfed afterwards. Fun times at the gym that day. I have heard of other people running through them, though, and having them go away.

     

     

     

     

    I don't know about just ignoring them.  I tried a lot of stuff when I first had them, nothing helped.  But they were very consistent, no pain on slower runs, only fast runs or races.  And always started at 1 mile, stopped at 3.  If it gets worse or hurts all the time, you need to do something cocrete, like see a doctor.

     

     





    Len

  • FormerBAM We're Not Worthy 4,378 posts since
    Aug 21, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    18. Sep 8, 2008 4:52 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Situation

     

    I find this all very interesting.  As you all know from my frequent whining, I began having a "shin" problem last March/April when training for the CMM.  It's on the inside of my shin, behind the big shin bone, halfway up the inside of my lower leg, almost goes into shin/calf.  When it's really bad, there's tingling shooting through my leg and into my foot.

     

     

     

     

     

    And it got so bad after the two marathons in three weeks that I couldn't run.  At all.  Hurt severely.  After an MRI that showed nothing, I basically ran nothing for two months and it was much better.  Started running again and the first thing I felt was the exact same spot.  And now that I'm training a lot for another marathon, it hurts worse.  And worse.  I've done the shin exercises pretty regular the last few weeks, stretched it, iced it, nothing helps.  And it's definitely not healed.  And it's definitely the exact same spot, on one leg only.  And it's definitely not my shoes.

     

     

     

     

     

    So here I am six months later in the exact same position I was in six months ago, wondering if I'm causing damage, how it's ever going to get better if I keep running, if it will come back immediately when I do run again.  I didn't ignore it, went to the doctor, started stretching, but would be in the exact same position even if I HAD ignored it.  Sometimes I think you just live with it.  And btw, every doctor I've seen has told me that shin splints DO go away as you run, as mine usually does.  There's too much conflicting advice sometimes...  I'm frustrated and confused.

     

     

  • Back in the Saddle Amateur 45 posts since
    Dec 29, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    19. Sep 8, 2008 5:01 PM (in response to FormerBAM)
    Re: Situation

     

    No one has mentioned so far- but do you  have THE STICK? When I started having shin problems, I used the stick on the sides of my legs by my shins to relax the muscles. Ice and new shoes are a must! The Dixie cup/frozen ice idea that was brought up  is actually something I learned about in physical therapy, and it really helps.

     

     





    We have nothing to fear but fear itself. -FDR
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    20. Sep 8, 2008 6:30 PM (in response to FormerBAM)
    Re: Situation

    Nita, I can sympathize with you. I had them for years and nothing I did helped - exercises, stretching, ice. But they never bothered me on an everyday training run. That they go away during the run would seem to eliminate compartment syndrome and an MRI should have found a stress fracture. That leaves the ill-defined "shin-splints", which nobody seems to be able to explain or tell you how to fix. And like you said - are you doing further damage? Maybe I just got lucky that the exercises are working, though I am also using the stick.

     

     

     

     

     

    You might want to take a look at this article and consider where/whether you fit in his discussion of "Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome". http://www.drpribut.com/sports/pributruna.pdf You have to scroll down some to get to that part of the article.





    Len

  • dutch omi We're Not Worthy 5,642 posts since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    21. Sep 8, 2008 6:32 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Situation

    Len, how's your stomach?

  • thefirecat Community Moderator 2,779 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    22. Sep 8, 2008 6:40 PM (in response to dutch omi)
    Re: Situation
    dutch omi wrote:

    Len, how's your stomach?

     

    Hopefully not in his shins.





    God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy.

  • dutch omi We're Not Worthy 5,642 posts since
    Jan 19, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    23. Sep 8, 2008 6:42 PM (in response to thefirecat)
    Re: Situation

    Sara, that would not be pretty.

  • thefirecat Community Moderator 2,779 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    24. Sep 8, 2008 6:46 PM (in response to dutch omi)
    Re: Situation
    dutch omi wrote:

    Sara, that would not be pretty.

     

    But it might explain both the indigestion and the shin pain. Of course, Len is thin enough that his stomach might actually FIT in his shin, unlike me.





    God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    25. Sep 8, 2008 6:55 PM (in response to thefirecat)
    Re: Situation

     

    thefirecat wrote:
    dutch omi wrote:

    Sara, that would not be pretty.But it might explain both the indigestion and the shin pain. Of course, Len is thin enough that his stomach might actually FIT in his shin, unlike me.

     

     

     

    Are you sure you're looking at the same Len as I look at?  I'm not fat, but thin?  Uh uh.  The stomach was pretty good on my run today - not quite 100% - and no shin pain.  I weighed myself before and after the 5-miler: 188.5 before, 184.5 after, 4 pound loss.  That seems like a lot to me, but at least I know why I lose 8 or 9 pounds on a 20-miler.

     

     





    Len

  • thefirecat Community Moderator 2,779 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    26. Sep 8, 2008 7:02 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Situation
    lenzlaw wrote:

     

    thefirecat wrote:
    dutch omi wrote:

    Sara, that would not be pretty.But it might explain both the indigestion and the shin pain. Of course, Len is thin enough that his stomach might actually FIT in his shin, unlike me.

     

     

     

    Are you sure you're looking at the same Len as I look at?  I'm not fat, but thin?  Uh uh.  The stomach was pretty good on my run today - not quite 100% - and no shin pain.  I weighed myself before and after the 5-miler: 188.5 before, 184.5 after, 4 pound loss.  That seems like a lot to me, but at least I know why I lose 8 or 9 pounds on a 20-miler.

     

     

     

    Must be the singlet is very slimming, or something. Besides which, I have a rule: if my arms go all the way round you when I hug you, you're thin.





    God is great, beer is good, and people are crazy.

  • Redward Amateur 16 posts since
    Aug 22, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    27. Sep 8, 2008 8:39 PM (in response to thefirecat)
    Re: Situation

    (me) You can do a bunch of exercises and both may go away, or you can quit worrying about them both, do nothing, and chances are they will still go away.

     

    (response) "Yeah, I ignored mine. And they became stress fractures. Yay bone trauma. I knew I had to do something about mine when it hurt so bad I yarfed afterwards. Fun times at the gym that day. I have heard of other people running through them, though, and having them go away."

     

     

    I just learned by reading the runners medical guide that apparently "shin splints" is used to describe several types of injury, including stress fractures.  I had only heard it as inflammation of the tissue surrounding the bone.

    My shin splints were inflammation, a typical sprinter's injury in high school, which got so bad during speed workouts that I couldn't continue. The shin pain I have during marathons is fleeting, and goes away as I warm up, though it feels vaguely like a mild form of what I consider shin splints.

    However, if you have an overuse injury or a stress fracture it won't go away by ignoring it.

    Ed

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,267 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    28. Sep 9, 2008 5:53 AM (in response to Redward)
    Re: Situation

    I guess that's the question.  How do you decide if it's shin splints or something more serious?  Some of it is just experience, but beyond that you try exercises, stretching, etc, and if it doesn't go away you see a doctor.





    Len

  • Jimmy_D_Jarhead We're Not Worthy 4,477 posts since
    Dec 15, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    29. Sep 9, 2008 6:06 AM (in response to Redward)
    Re: Situation

     

    If the pain is persistent then I would definately find and try and remedy the reason for the pain.  Some level of discomfort is to be expected.  I am surely not the guy that says running will ruin your knees but I do wonder what damage if any we do to our bodies because of built of pain tolerances.  I believe that being hydrated fills the body and its many components with liquid and that the small pain is weakness leaving the body but at what point is damage being done.  We are all diferent and I have 15-20 years running experience that llows me to know when to back off and when to go see a doctor.  I have had 2 stress fractures in my left foot (1 from rolling it just right in a field hockey game) and been hit with the ITB syndrome twice in those 15-20 years.  I have on many occassions not ignored but strengthened problem areas and have remained active and healthy well inot my young adult life. 

     

     

     

     

     

    Jesus what I am saying is if you are concerned about the "situation" you need to be proactive instead of reactive in getting a sense of comfort about it.  reactive often times leads to a lapse in training or even worse a lay-off from training while the body heals itself.  Best of luck to you my brother.  Also go fill your gas tank up so you are not scrambling to do so in a few days.  It was hectic down here last weekend.  I would fill it up every morning until Ike goes away.

     

     

     

     

     

    Jimmy

     

     






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