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2256 Views 10 Replies Latest reply: Feb 1, 2009 7:15 PM by lenzlaw RSS
callingsarah Rookie 5 posts since
Jan 15, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Jan 23, 2009 8:47 AM

Running Posture

Hello,

 

 

I am a decently athletic female, 26, who trains in other areas than running. I've been running for several months now-- training for a half next month and a full in May. My question is this. What can I do with my posture to improve efficiency in my runs...? I don't want to waste calories, air, etc. because I have "bad" running posture. How straight should my back be? I see people run with rear ends stuck way out. What have you found is most efficient to do with your arms? Where should I keep my gaze...? Any help would be apprecaited.

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,340 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Jan 28, 2009 11:21 AM (in response to callingsarah)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    My two-cents: The consensus (among "experts") seems to be whatever way you run is most efficient for you. Running efficiency appears to be a complicated subject, there are no easy "fix-ups" and what works for one person may or may not work for the next. The one thing I can recommend is to make sure your footplant on each stride is directly under your body (as nearly as possible).

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,340 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Jan 28, 2009 1:34 PM (in response to callingsarah)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    No, meaning not in front of you.  Don't reach forward and plant ahead of your body. This places extra stress on the legs, knees particularly, and also provides some "braking" while your body catches up to your foot.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Jan 28, 2009 1:59 PM (in response to callingsarah)
    Re: Running Posture

    There is such a thing as proper running form, and posture is key to it. Of course, the key to posture is a strong core. While core training has in the past been dismissed by runners, most elites now schedule core training sessions several times weekly. I highly recommend going to runnersworld.com and searching for articles related to posture and core strength. Every issue of the magazine has something on this subject.





    Robert Martin

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  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,340 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Jan 30, 2009 8:53 PM (in response to callingsarah)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    Here is a source of rather extensive discussion of running technique and efficiency if you would like to read up on it.

     

     

    http://www.sportsscientists.com/2008/01/running-technique.html

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Jan 31, 2009 7:15 AM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    Interesting website. But where's the science? This person claims that support for proper running form is mostly anectodal, then fails to support his own claims with science. He does admit in the article I have linked below that the two methods he has focused on are good. The problem is implementation. I would argue he is correct. 

     

     

    http://www.sportsscientists.com/2007/09/running-technique-part-iv-running.html

     

     

    "But there was still some excellent theoretical support for both methods 

     

    Having

    said this, let me emphasize that the issue is not with the concept, or

    the principles, because they are actually very good, for both Pose and

    Chi running. The theory for Pose, as explained on the website, is

    actually the best explanation for good running technique that I have

    read, it's well worth looking at. The problem is with the delivery, the

    implementation."





    Robert Martin

    NFPT Certified Personal Trainer

    NFPT Endurance Specialist

    RRCA Running Coach

    SPINNING Instructor

    GRAVITY Personal Training Instructor

    GRAVITY Group Instructor

    Power Plate Level II Instructor

    2010 & 2011 Team Aquaphor Sponsored Athlete

    Gatorade G Series PRO Lead Ambassador, San Diego

    http://www.hardcoretrainingsystems.com

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,340 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Jan 31, 2009 3:45 PM (in response to Run Coach Robert)
    Re: Running Posture

    If the evidence is anecdotal, then there is no science. One thing I think they do is discuss issues where true research is lacking and try to make sense of what information is out there. It doesn't make them right or wrong, it's just a discussion. Where research is available, they quote it and apply it to the discussion. Pose is a good example. There is a lot of good in Pose and Chi Running, though they're not exactly perfect either. I have read the Chi Running book and there's a lot of stuff where, well, you just have to be a believer. And there's very little science behind any of it.

     

     

     

     

     

    Len





    Len

  • Run Coach Robert Legend 782 posts since
    Jan 7, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Jan 31, 2009 4:54 PM (in response to lenzlaw)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    I am neither a student or advocate for either Pose or Chi Running. I do, though, believe in the value of proper biomechanics. Point is, "experts" agree that there is such a thing as proper running form. It is the implementation that is debatable. There are just too many variables for any study on implementation to be truly scientific.      

     

     

     





    Robert Martin

    NFPT Certified Personal Trainer

    NFPT Endurance Specialist

    RRCA Running Coach

    SPINNING Instructor

    GRAVITY Personal Training Instructor

    GRAVITY Group Instructor

    Power Plate Level II Instructor

    2010 & 2011 Team Aquaphor Sponsored Athlete

    Gatorade G Series PRO Lead Ambassador, San Diego

    http://www.hardcoretrainingsystems.com

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,340 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Feb 1, 2009 7:15 PM (in response to Run Coach Robert)
    Re: Running Posture

     

    There is a good article in the March Running Times concerning the ongoing discussion (controversy?) about good/efficient running form (Page 18: Owner's Manual, Run Softly, Naturally). The information, I think, is still mostly opinion, with little or no scientific evidence to support it. Some things seem to be generally agreed: "If you get people to run tall, run with a fast cadence, and get their feet landing underneath them and not in front of them, they can make themselves more efficient fairly quickly." (Malcolm Balk) ("Fast cadence" is 180 - 190 footstrikes per minute.)

     

     

     

     

     

    Len

     

     





    Len

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