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1962 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Aug 16, 2009 6:13 PM by ImaHuffin
Beth Roy Rookie 6 posts since
Jun 6, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 15, 2009 9:00 AM

Humidity

 

Is it better to run with a higher temperature but lower humidity or lower temperature and higher humidity?

 

 

 

 

 

I don't typically like to run in the morning because I don't seem to have a lot of energy at that time.  But, the temperature is lower.  However, I did notice on weather.com that the humidity is higher in the morning than in the evening.  Of course, the temperature is higher in the evening. So, I guess I am just trying to figure out which is better.  My feeling is that the humidity is getting the best of me in the morning. 

 

 

I would love to hear anyone's opinion on this.

 

 

Thanks,

 

 

Beth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • My legs hurt Rookie 5 posts since
    Mar 18, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Aug 15, 2009 9:59 AM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

    Beth,  I am currently running in the morning and I feel like I should be a fish.  The humidity is just crazy here (Florida panhandle).  I would prefer to run in the evening but during the summer I feel it is "safer" to run with the lower temps even at a higher humidity.  I agree that it gets the best of people, as I have lost a lot of motivation and I am blaming that on the heat and humidity.  My mileage has dropped too, but I am not giving up.  Just make sure you stay hydrated and give yourself pleanty of time to cool down.  Happy running.

  • ravyn440 Expert 68 posts since
    Apr 18, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    2. Aug 15, 2009 11:50 AM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

    I live in Phoenix, so running in the morning when it's cooler is pretty much the only option for me.  At 7pm, it's still over 100 degrees outside.  Yuck.

     

    How much heat/humidity are we talking about here?  I would much rather run when it's 80 outside and 30% humidity than when it's 95+.  Try doing an identical run in the morning vs. the evening and see how you feel - preferences are different for everyone.

  • chuck43 Expert 1,054 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Aug 15, 2009 12:34 PM (in response to ravyn440)
    Re: Humidity

    I live in Pensacola Florida, in the mornings the temp can be 76 but with 90 percent humidity the heat index can take the temps near the 90's. The temp and humidity together feels like 90 or so. It just depends on your heat index which is better. In the mornings the ground has not heated up and when you run in the evenings it's still giving off the heat of the day. Also mornings you have less to come up during the day to spoil a run. If you work in the heat like I do you are drained when you get home . Factor in your heat index and see if the mornings are better than evenings.

  • cyndi t Legend 1,061 posts since
    Aug 11, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Aug 15, 2009 12:39 PM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

    I'm in NJ and its been pretty humid here to but I am a morning runner and dont' think I'd be able to do it at night since my perception (and I could be wrong) is that it is much worse after work than before.  I'm up and out really early (4:30 or so) so I do most of my run before the sun comes up therefore I'm not dealing with the direct sun either.





    TRUST THE TRAINING!

  • TaintedMeat Amateur 15 posts since
    Aug 13, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Aug 15, 2009 8:03 PM (in response to cyndi t)
    Re: Humidity

    I live in Louisville, KY and I always run in the evening around 7-7:30. The park I run at has tons of trees so it feels much cooler than the rest of the city. When I lived in Daytona Beach, Florida, I usually ran in the morning or after 9 at night because it would get so hot during the middle of the day and even twilight. 

     

     

    To answer your question, it is really up to you.  Try both and see which you like better, or switch it up from day to day depending on the forecast.





    Races

    October 24, 2009 - Knobstone Trail Mini Marathon - Martinsville, IN 2:12:50

  • Bodacious Pro 653 posts since
    Nov 9, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Aug 15, 2009 9:04 PM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

     

    It all just sucks, heat and humidity just drags you down! There never is a good time to run in it

     

     

    All my life I lived in cool places then last year we moved to Panama City FL, it has been a shock to my system, don't know what I was thinking choosing Marine Corps Marathon as my first and having to train during the summer time!

     

     

    I have been surviving it, I think what helped me it when things started to warm up early on in the season I would go out and run during the warmer parts of the day, I think you just have to get your body accustomed to it. My husband can't run more than 3 miles outside down here, but he sits in AC all day, he rarely puts himself out there in the heat, I get myself out there in the heat as much as I can so it is probably not such a shock to my system. I am slowed down by it tho, I just ran 17 miles while on a trip to Alaska and ran those miles quicker than the 14 I did down here 2 weeks previous.

     

     

    I mostly do my weekday runs in the evenings mostly because I am not a morning person, the only thing about evenings is the bugs are out real thick! My long Sunday runs are mostly done in the mornings, I guess on long runs I prefer the humidity over the sun beating down on me Also I find there are fewer storms in the morning so I try to get a long run done before the storms roll in.

     

     

    Wave to Chuck while I am here  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     





    Dream Big Always :)

  • Marykb Legend 1,347 posts since
    Jan 16, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Aug 16, 2009 10:22 AM (in response to Bodacious)
    Re: Humidity

    Its a good question.  I guess the bottom line is the heat index.   If the combined heat/humidity in the AM (lower temp/higher humidity) is roughly the same as in the PM (higher temp/lower humidity) it seems like it would be about the same either way. But if you have breathing problems such as asthma, the higher humidity might

    have a worse effect on you.  Also, in extreme humidity when the sweat can't evaporate I think your body temp gets higher than it would in drier air - but that might still be offset by the higher overall temperature.   In Atlanta, the humidity can easily be 90% with temps in the mid 70's on summer mornings.  I'm so used to it by the end of the summer that it doesn't bother too much - other than slowing me down.   Really, it comes down to your own preference.   I might run slower in the morning humidity, but I am a morning person and morning runs fit my schedule.  If you prefer evening running, you can come up with just as many reasons to do it then.  The main thing is to do what works best for you overall even if it means you might run a little bit slower during warm weather.  (You will make up for it when temps cool down!)





  • _Miles Pro 147 posts since
    Jul 26, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Aug 16, 2009 10:57 AM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

    What a timely question. I usually do my runs in the evenings, also where it is hotter but usually drier and just ran this morning. It was definitely cooler but immediately I could tell it was more humid. I am from the southwest where I am used to a dry heat, and have been running C25K since June where it can still be in the 90s when I am running in the evenings, but generally pretty dry. I noticed for me personally this morning's run was difficult, there wasn't as much of a breeze as normal and I felt "heavier" I think directly as a result of the humidity. But really, I think it all comes down to what you are used to. Obviously we'd all prefer to be running in maybe a 75-80 degree non-humid weather (or is that just me?) but I think with practice you get yourself used to certain conditions, and changing that up can make things a struggle. Or that's what I noticed anyways.





    C25k Completed 08/19/11

    OHR Completed 10/23/11

    5k 09/24/11: 39:10

    2011: 280 miles, ~14:00 mm avg

    2012: 321.2 miles (so far)

  • Marykb Legend 1,347 posts since
    Jan 16, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Aug 16, 2009 11:49 AM (in response to _Miles)
    Re: Humidity

     

    Obviously we'd all prefer to be running in maybe a 75-80 degree non-humid weather (or is that just me?)

    Not me.  I'd always prefer to run in 60 degrees. Perfect!





  • ImaHuffin Amateur 21 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Aug 16, 2009 6:13 PM (in response to Beth Roy)
    Re: Humidity

    I live in Sarasota, FL where it's hot and humid and I can tell you from running all summer that I would take the humidity over the heat any day hands down!  I try to run at the hottest times of the day when I can, so I can build up my stamina for my tennis game, which is often played into the heat of the day.  If it's hot and humid but the sun's not shining down (maybe some cloud cover) it's much easier as well.  if it's not so hot but the sun's beating down, it feels twice as hot. I always google text the weather before and towards the end of my run and I document that on my running log along with how I felt, whether I felt hotter or it if it was 96 deg but felt like 85 or whatever.  Also, when I do run in the cooler weather, it makes it so much easier.

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