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35445 Views 296 Replies Latest reply: Oct 10, 2011 6:08 AM by Suzanne84 RSS Go to original post 1 ... 14 15 16 17 18 ... 20 Previous Next
  • Forrest Duck Pro 121 posts since
    May 6, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    225. Oct 19, 2009 9:21 AM (in response to Donna914)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    What's with this rash of bad runs?  Could it be the sudden change in tempuratures?  On Saturday I suddenly felt so sleepy in the mid-afternoon that I had to stop what I was doing and take a nap.  I slept for two hours!  Yesterday I planned a 5 1/2 mile run and struggled through 3 1/2.

     

    But I really like what Michael said about a "bad" day bing only 3 and a half miles.  How cool is that?

     

    Well, back at it Tuesday!

     

    As a side bar, I learned something else.  I'm gonna get a pair of those runner's gloves.  My hands were so cold that I pulled my long sleeves over them.





    Finish well!

  • Forrest Duck Pro 121 posts since
    May 6, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    226. Oct 19, 2009 9:48 AM (in response to Donna914)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Donna,

     

    Your first 5k is coming up, and I thought I would offer a nickle's worth of whatever.

     

    It's easy to say "don't be nervous", but you will not be alone at the back of the pack.  The atmosphere in the back is usually relaxed and it can be friendly.  Without be chatty, you can actually have some supportive conversation, especially if you have to do any walking.  You might even offer that this is your first 5k.  The support and motivation that comes from helping each other along is wonderful.  Since you all will be going at your pace, you might leap-frog the same few people several times, so don't be shy.

     

    Rest in the days before the race.  I run in the evenings, so my last run will be Wednesday.  This give my joints two full days to recover from the pounding.  I don't think an extra run will add anything to my ability to run on race day, but resting the ol' bod let's me be stronger on the big day.  You will find out what works best for you after you've been in a few races.

     

    Whatever you time is, you will have established your goal for the next race.

     

    Enjoy the run!





    Finish well!

  • kimc921 Pro 108 posts since
    Apr 15, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    227. Oct 19, 2009 10:31 AM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Runner's World has a section devoted to Beginners, and there is a man, Marc Parent, that writes a column each month called "The Newbie Chronicles".  He started running a few months ago and is making pretty slow progress (progress none the less!), but he is really encouraging and hilarious!  If you need a good laugh and to know that you're not the only one, check it out.  Go to  www.runnersworld.com, Blogs, For Beginners Only, then click on the Newbie Chronicles.  There are several months of articles available.

     

    Jenny, my daughter is getting married next August, so I may have to ask for tips on how to keep your sanity!

     

    Have a great week everyone!





    "Success isn't how far you got, but the distance you traveled from where you started."

           -- Steve Prefontaine

    One more breath, one more step, one more mile, FINISH LINE!

    "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."

  • WaddlingBison Rookie 6 posts since
    Sep 29, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    228. Oct 19, 2009 1:30 PM (in response to Forrest Duck)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    So I just ran--rather, participated in--my first 5K, this past Saturday.

     

    Okay, Penpals, confession time: I haven't sincerely trained in weeks.  Sure, I'd take the odd day and jump on the elliptical for a while.  But for the last several weeks, I've just been too distracted (and often overwhelmed) by the stuff of life.  And what I learned on Saturday was that I've unfortunately lost a step or two due to my lack of consistent training.  Sadly, I didn't have that many steps to give up in the first place.

     

    So Saturday was in some ways a wake-up call, a reminder that this new life I supposedly want to pursue is going to take hard work, determination, and consistency.  Qualities I haven't exhibited much in the last month or so.

     

    This is my public mea culpa.  And my promise to get back on the road, for reals this time.  (Starting tomorrow--I have softball playoffs tonight.)

     

    BUT.  On the positive side, I found out that the thing I keep reading in magazines and books is true: the running community is filled with really, REALLY nice people.  My 5K was also a half-marathon, and shared several stretches of the track with the half course.  I lost the marathoners from the initial gun, and quickly lost sight of the other 5Kers within the first half mile (this course had two MAJOR hills in the first mile, which drained me almost instantly--the rest of my race was carried out at a determined trudge, not even a walk).  Around the 2-mile marker, I made a turn and started seeing marathoners drafting past me.  Over and over, as they passed, I'd hear, "Good job!"  "Keep it up, man!"  "Looking good, bud!"  "Way to go!"  "You're doing great!"

     

    Seriously.  Strangers were encouraging me as i trudged along.  Dozens of them.  It was kind of great.  I was focusing on my knotted-up lower back and the blister growing along the length of my left foot, and these kind folks were cheering me on.  The best one was a guy, about 6'3", muscular build, who called over his shoulder, "This is where it all starts, man."  Then he turns around, backpedaling away from me for a moment, gives me a thumbs up and says, "200 pounds."  Then turns and speeds off.

     

    Now, I'm not only glacier-slow; I'm glacier-wide.  So I know he wasn't talking about me.  In that moment, I knew exactly what he meant.  He was at the end of the same journey I'm just beginning.  And I couldn't help, in the moment, but imagine in two, three, four years, that it will be me, turning to a grunting, sweating, trudging fat guy participating in his first 5K, and say, "This is where it all starts man--250 pounds."

     

    That thought, I'm keeping with me to help me through the hard runs.

     

    First 5K (10/17/09):  1:04:23 (chip)





    "Last-place finisher is a heckuva lot better than first-place didn't-even-try."

    I'm not a fast runner.  I'm not even a slow runner.  I'm a glacial runner.  But I'll still work just as hard as you do, and run just as far as you can, while carrying 3 times as much weight as you.  Because I'm that awesome.

  • eileen47 Expert 47 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    230. Oct 19, 2009 3:18 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    All of your posts about how encouraging other runners are are so true. I've plodded along in five (I think) 5K's so far, and the people with me in back are friendly, caring, and encouraging. I'm still trying to beat 45 minutes for a 5K.

     

    Our daughter, who is a 30-minute 5Ker, has stayed with me the last two races. Next year, I'm thinking of having two shirts made: one with Mother on the back, the other with Daughter. : )

     

    I'm still on week 4. And it takes me about half a mile to get the negative thoughts out of my mind and begin telling myself, I can do this, Just keep at it.

     

    Eileen (61, a bit round, diagnosed type 2 diabetic June 07; never an athlete until Jan '07 when I began C25K; first time doing C25K took 16+ weeks; have done C25K about 3 times now when "life interrupts" and my running stops)

  • classicallytrained Legend 375 posts since
    Jul 20, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    231. Oct 19, 2009 4:27 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Rainy Day,

     

    Seeing that picture of your furry friend reminded me of a story I heard recently.

    I hope it gives everyone a little perspective of why we do what we do:

     

    Two guys went camping. In the middle of the night, a grizzly bear wandered into their camp

    and woke them while trying to get in their tent.

    One guy jumped up and started to run barefoot through the woods. He looked back

    over his shoulder and saw his friend stopping and putting on his shoes.

    "You think we can outrun that bear?" he shouted.

    "I don't care!" his friend shouted back. " 'Cause all I have to do is outrun you!"

     

    Regardless of why we run - whether to lose weight, to manage stress

    before it damages us or to stay ahead of the "beast" - it is a concious choice we make every day.

    Just don't forget to put on your shoes.  

     

    Finish strong!





  • classicallytrained Legend 375 posts since
    Jul 20, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    232. Oct 19, 2009 4:33 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group
    Did you say 4.6 miles? Seriously? WTG!




  • Forrest Duck Pro 121 posts since
    May 6, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    233. Oct 20, 2009 10:01 AM (in response to WaddlingBison)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Bison,

     

    Kudos on participating in your first 5k!  (Using your word.)  But you completed it, and it proves your tag line.

     

    One thought that I had while reading your post is something that I heard a few years ago on another subject.  That is, what is your "why"?  How big is your "why"?  It has to be big enough to get us moving.  It is not different from motivation, but more concrete, I think.

     

    I have been looking at my "why" for the last couple of weeks.  Initially my "why" was to run the 10k with my brother, marking the anniversary of my decision to start running.  That was Sep 26, and I have noticed a dimished motivation since then.  I have continued to run, but my "why" is smaller.  I have been mulling over some goals, but being serious about running is a big commitment to time, even if I don't run every day.  I'm not going to stop, but I need it to be a little bit fun anyway.

     

    I appreciate the honesty in your post.  I admire those who have to go, and have come, a lot farther.  So I lost 20 punds...I put four back on in the last two weeks.  It's time I got back into it, so today my lunch was celery with peanut butter.  There's protein and good carbs in pb, right?

     

    This web site and this thread are the greatest.  We can help each other carry on, just the same as at the back of the pack.  So, hang in there bison.  We're with you as much as these words and our thoughts and prayers will allow.





    Finish well!

  • eileen47 Expert 47 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    234. Oct 20, 2009 10:35 AM (in response to Forrest Duck)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    The epidemic of bad runs, as RainyDay called it, touched me today. I'm still on w4: yesterday's run was fine, today I just couldn't do the last half-mile run. Maybe staying up late for the Broncos/Chargers game and getting up early took extra energy out.

     

    The first time I ran outside when it was cool was when I discovered the advantage of gloves and a hat. A very kind, experienced "speedster" loaned me an extra hat and gloves he kept in a supply box in his truck for other newbies.

  • Smashville Pro 93 posts since
    Oct 20, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    235. Oct 20, 2009 12:24 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Greetings, all! I'm Patten, I'm new and I'm slow!

     

    I've introduced myself already in the newbie runner 200+ C25K thread, so I'm going to try not to repeat myself much...but I will a bit, I'm 28, I'm male, I'm 312 pounds, and I'm making my third attempt to start the C25K tonight (because I couldn't get out of bed this morning)...

     

    I'm also, as I mentioned, slow...I've never been a "runner" per se, but I did run cross country in middle school in order to train for wrestling (which I was also not good at) and my only goal every time out was not to finish last (which I accomplished everytime...sometimes barely).

     

    Over the past few years, I've entered a few 5Ks exclusively as a walker...at least until last week when I entered and tried a modified version of the C25K plan (basically, I just extended it until I was done) and finished in 49:55...but according to my Garmin, when I ran, I was running at a 13:30 pace...

     

    But enough about that...as I mentioned, I've entered a few 5Ks as a walker over the past few years, but none will top the one I entered on Labor Day a few years ago.

     

    This was the rare 5K where you could bring your dog with you, so I jumped at the chance and entered myself and my dog...assuming that a 5 year old Jack Russell Terrier could easily complete a 5K, a 10K, a marathon and the Indy 500...and then want to go for a walk. Mac and I started towards the back with the walkers...and were making pretty good time through the first mile (there were a ton of people behind us)...and then I let him leave the course to hike his leg. Suddenly, he realized he could leave the course...and so every 10-15 feet, Mac would leave the course to sniff something...never on the same side of the street. By the second mile, we were in dead last...and about halfway through the second mile...Mac laid down and quit...I had to pick up my dog and carry him for about a half of a mile to the finish line...only, we lost the course. The safety car zoomed right by me and they started picking up the course markers. Then the ambulance zoomed by me. Luckily, I grew up in this town and I knew where the start/finish line ended...but I didn't know which street it came in on...so I guessed...and guessed wrong. I finished so far back that they had picked up the course...I was wearing a chip...they were already taking down the finish line, so I had to go find a member of the local running organization to clip off my chip so I didn't get charged for it.

     

    Needless to say, we didn't have a time.





    Run, Noob! Run! - My Blog.

    Follow me on Twitter: @RunNoobRun

    C25K Week: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

  • eileen47 Expert 47 posts since
    Dec 14, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    236. Oct 20, 2009 12:35 PM (in response to Smashville)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Hey, Patten, very good story about your Labor Day race. LOL at this image of your carrying your dog and losing the course. We penguins have similar stories, but yours is the funniest I've read in  a while.

     

    Your 13:30 pace is great - beats mine. On the TM I run at 3.5; outside I run faster but get so out of breath I take more walk breaks. You're young - you can certainly finish C25K (if it takes longer than 9 weeks, so be it) and then do circles around us - you can already do circles around your dog.

     

    Thanks for joining us.

  • classicallytrained Legend 375 posts since
    Jul 20, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    238. Oct 21, 2009 5:21 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Rainy Day,

     

    Holy Cow! That was intense! I feel your pain.

     

    Finding your pace can be very frustrating. No one wants to run 17 min. miles the rest of their lives.

     

    From my research, here are some suggestions I have come across. Everyone is different so they may work or not.

     

    1. To establish your pace, try counting the number of steps you take in a minute at a particular speed.

    For example, let's say you take X number of steps/minute while running at 4.5 on a treadmill. When you get outside, look at your

    plain vanilla watch with a second hand and run that same number of steps. I imagine, after a while, you will remember what that feels like.

    I got this idea from a Marine nick-named Jimmy Jarhead on the MCM page.

     

    2. To increase speed, I have been told to train for speed on days other than when you do your long runs. Running 1/4 mile sprints, resting and repeating is one

    way of accomplishing this. There are articles about interval training at Runners World.com. Don't try to do speed work and long runs at the same time.

     

    3. Get a trainer. If you are having trouble working by yourself, maybe a local running club would have some resources or people that could help.

    There are videos on you tube that address the items as well. 

     

    Hopefully, these suggestions will help us all work through the challenges that are ahead.





  • DanceWalkRunPenguin Pro 84 posts since
    Oct 12, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    239. Oct 21, 2009 7:00 PM (in response to RainyDayRun)
    Re: Penguin Support Group

    Do you use music?  You can download music (I'm told, by people who do this) by pace and by beat. Then you keep up with the rhythm. Kind of like step class, but outdoors and in a straight line.





    ~~~~~Newbie Jogger~~~~~~~

    Regular Walker

    Never-before Runner

    On injured list. Switching to swimming until leg muscles are healed.

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