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4210 Views 10 Replies Latest reply: Jan 2, 2011 12:40 AM by frmeital
vairvixen Rookie 4 posts since
Dec 14, 2007
Currently Being Moderated

Dec 14, 2009 5:03 PM

Shin Pain - Help?

I just started the C25K and I am not a runner, at least not the long-distance kind.  I've always been an action-sports kinda girl, so this "just running" thing is really new to me.

 

I have a question that I hope someone can help me with.  I've been training on a treadmill and I'm on Week 2 of the C25K schedule.  I can't make it through 2 cycles without extreme cramping in my shin.  The pain goes away by the next day, but starts right back up again every time I train.

 

Am I not stretching enough?  (Honestly, I don't even know how to stretch those particular muscles)

Am I running "funny"?

Am I just a wimp?

 

Any advice would be wonderful!  Thank in advance!

 

Kristy

  • Haselsmasher Legend 520 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. Dec 14, 2009 5:12 PM (in response to vairvixen)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    If you've been active prior to C25K is it possible you're doing your sessions more aggressively than you should?  Some people think "Hey - I"m an active person.  I can do this." and then they learn that running really taxes the body in ways other sports don't.  When running/jogging you should be able to hold a conversation with a ( real or imaginary) person were they running with you.

     

    To massage the shin muscles:  The Stick would probably work well.  I've heard someone suggest kneeling at the top of a step or step or set of stairs, and let your foot hang over the edge of the step pointing down.  (Your shin will be on the floor.)  Put a tennis ball under your shin and use that to massage the shin muscle.

     

    Also, you might try some shin strengthening.  I wrote a short article about shin splints here that describes what I've done when I get shin splints.

     

    Jim





    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • JasonCR Pro 70 posts since
    Aug 30, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. Dec 15, 2009 12:29 PM (in response to vairvixen)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    I have found that by parking at the far end of the company parking lot, and then walking for several minutes at a good pace from work to the car (gym bag) to the company gym on campus, that my shin splints are greatly reduced on the treadmill.  I have had them for a long time and generally "run them off" (so I guess my case isn't too bad) but I didn't realize that's what the term shin splints meant until recently.  Worst case was outside, 8 AM in the cold at the half marathon ... 6 miles of torture before they eased up -- so I guess being freezing cold and little warm-up and starting at average race pace was a terrible idea, ha.





    Just Do It!

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    4. Dec 16, 2009 6:11 AM (in response to JasonCR)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    Jason is right that shin splints can self-correct during activity.

     

    Think about what a (front of shin bone) shin-splint is: After your footstrike leaves the ground to prepare for another, the Tibialis Anterior muscle raises the foot (dorsiflexion) to insure that the toe clears the ground. Compared to a bare foot, the running shoe usually adds an inch or two to the length of the toe, adding more work to this task. It can take a while to adapt, and a walk is a good warm-up to prepare the muscles by boosting circulation there to avoid cramps.

     

    Your muscles will swell during activity, but they will also grow over the weeks and months to accommodate it. These muscles may actually increase in size to the point that they outgrow the muscle compartment fascia. If the compartment fails to expand, Compartment Syndrome can be the result, which can be way more painful than mere shin-splints. Given enough time (and some good massage), it will stretch. In extreme cases, people resort to surgery, but patience will eventually be rewarded. It depends on how much time you have (some pros don't have any time to wait).

     

    Many of us have been through this phase. We feel your pain!

     

    re: The Stick... If you use it (or any massage tool), make sure to stroke toward the heart, or you can damage the semilunar valves in your veins and lymphatic system that are designed to prevent backflow during the centrifugal force of limb activity. Varicose veins can result.

  • Haselsmasher Legend 520 posts since
    May 25, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    6. Dec 21, 2009 8:56 PM (in response to vairvixen)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    I would not adavance in the C25K program until you saw positive progress with the shins.  The fact you're having pain means your body is not dealing with the current stress level.  So adding more activity without at least moving the pain vector into a positive direction, I believe, isn't wise.

     

    Justy my $.02.

     

    Jim





    "Kick off your high heel sneakers, it's party time."

    -- From the song FM by Steely Dan

  • JamesJohnsonLMT Legend 1,167 posts since
    Aug 23, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    7. Dec 23, 2009 5:19 AM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    I concur with Jim.

     

    The guidelines are flexible enough to allow you to recover with rest, inflammation control, massage, stretching and strengthening.

     

    Rome wasn't built in a day.

  • ColoCorredor Pro 97 posts since
    Dec 14, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    9. Dec 23, 2010 6:17 PM (in response to Haselsmasher)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    Thanks for the treatment suggestions!  Good advice.

     

    Happy Running!





    Believe you can do it. Think no other way but “Yes you can.”
    The human body is capable of considerably more physical endurance than most of us realize!!
  • frmeital Amateur 13 posts since
    Dec 7, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    10. Jan 2, 2011 12:40 AM (in response to vairvixen)
    Re: Shin Pain - Help?

    This article could help you figure out tha REASON for your shin splints. The sooner you discover the reason, the sooner you can prevent it from happening again. Hope it helps!





    My blog: http://natural-alternative-therapies.com

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