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2571 Views 6 Replies Latest reply: May 25, 2010 3:16 PM by incarnadine
incarnadine Rookie 4 posts since
Apr 28, 2010
Currently Being Moderated

Apr 28, 2010 7:41 AM

First trail 50K+: training question

I'm doing the Ultimate XC in Quebec/Tremblant on June 26, the 56k length. My only previous trail experience was the 35k edition from last year, which took about 4.5 hours.

 

Because the course is pretty tough (last year's 58k winner took about 7:20) I'm thinking that the race will take me about 9:30 or 10:00 or so.

 

My plan was for my longest training run to be about 25 miles/40 km. Because I'm training in NYC (mostly running on the West Side Highway path) on pretty flat asphalt, my training runs aren't going to be more than 4 or 5 hours even with walking breaks.

 

Should I be concerned that on race day I'll be doubling my maximum "time on my feet" that I've experienced in training?

 

-Jeff

  • Vin Camacho Pro 92 posts since
    Sep 4, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    1. May 3, 2010 11:10 AM (in response to incarnadine)
    Re: First trail 50K+: training question

    Why not at least hit up central park drive. At least you'll get some hills. I'm running a 50K this weekend, also live in NYC so my longest run in NYC was 24+ miles in Central Park I did recently complete a marathon in New Jersey. It sounds like your race day course may be very steep and technical. It's always going to be a concern, but being an unltra runner you going to have to get through it. It's a different mentality. Remember DNF stands for Did Nothing Fatal. However, I think with a long run of 25 miles you should be fine. When running ultras you never know what your going to encounter. Remember eat early and frequently.

     

    Good luck and enjoy the run.

     

    Take care,

     

    Vin





    "You don't stop running because you get old, you get old becasue you stop running"

    Take care, Train hard and Train smart. Sincerely, Vincent

  • Vin Camacho Pro 92 posts since
    Sep 4, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    3. May 4, 2010 10:59 AM (in response to incarnadine)
    Re: First trail 50K+: training question

    Yeah I know, ten hours is a while. I have not gone farther than a 50K which usually takes between 4:30 to 6 hours. I have talked to people who've ran 50 milers on no more than running a marathon before in training, and taking well over 10 hours to complete the 50 miler. If I were you, and I knew it was going to take me 10 hours to complete a race, I would try and put in a 5 to 6 hour run at around the pace you plan on keeping during the race (you may want to walk some of it, becasue you probably will on race day). And I would give three weeks between this training run and tha actual race.

     

    I hope this helps.

     

    Good luck, let me know how it goes.

     

    Take care,

     

    Vincent





    "You don't stop running because you get old, you get old becasue you stop running"

    Take care, Train hard and Train smart. Sincerely, Vincent

  • FitClubScott Amateur 9 posts since
    May 25, 2010
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. May 25, 2010 2:48 PM (in response to incarnadine)
    Re: First trail 50K+: training question

    I've run ultras (50k, 50m, 100m) for a few years now and when I first started training I tried to work up to one looong run based on the length of the race.  I always felt that I was trashed for the actual race.

     

    For the last year or so, I've switched to running what my training partners and I refer to as "sandwiches".  For a 50k, we might run 20-22 one day and 15-18 the next day...the theory being that the second day run will be on very tired legs without the trauma associated with one 35-40 mile training run.  Since switching, I've felt much better during training, as well as during the race.  In the interest of full disclosure, I'm a middle-of-the-packer, so if you are looking to win it, this might not work for you.

     

    Good luck.

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