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2037 Views 6 Replies Latest reply: Aug 23, 2010 1:58 PM by Beer and Cupcakes
JasonFitz1 Legend 575 posts since
Jun 19, 2009
Currently Being Moderated

Aug 11, 2010 6:31 PM

Need Feedback! After VO2 Max testing, I'm looking for smart runners to look at the results.

Hey everyone! I know there are a lot of smart (and maybe even nerdy) runners here who can help me decipher some test results. I recently had my VO2 Max and Ventilatory Threshold tested in a performance lab.

 

I posted all of the results, and the researcher's summary, on my site here: http://strengthrunning.com/2010/08/vo2-max-testing-ventilatory-threshold/.

 

Please let me know if you have any feedback or comments, either here on this thread or in the comments on my site. Either way, I'm looking for any insight you might have!

 

Thanks everyone!

- Fitz.





Strength Running
  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008

    This may be pretty basic, but I'm not quite sure what you're looking for.  Maybe my comments will encourage others to reply.

     

    My view is that VO2max is your potential, and VT, as a percentage of VO2max, is a measure of your efficiency.  If you're 100% efficient, they would coincide.  Increasing VO2max might be beneficial in that it may make achieving your current VT easier.  But increasing efficiency would seem to be the better bet.  Increasing efficiency should get you closer to VO2max at VT.

     

    Len





    Len

  • lenzlaw Community Moderator 10,431 posts since
    Jan 18, 2008

    I just had a chance to really read through Mark's analysis, which I found very interesting and accurate.  After the analysis though, the question becomes "What do you do about it?"  What, if any, changes do you make in training to create improvement?  Or are you already doing everything that is reasonable withing the constraints of the rest of your life?  Training and improvement, as Mark pointed out, are very individualistic.  What works for me may not work for you or the next guy.  In general terms I think you would want to assess your strengths and weaknesses.  Then work on improving the weaknesses while continuing to enhance the strengths where possible.  Kind of generic but I'm more of a critical observer than a coach.  I'm currently reading Run, the Mind-Body Method of Running by Feel (Matt Fitzgerald), which argues along the same lines from a slightly different angle.  I'm working on my own attempts at improvement after several years of just running for fun (not the worst thing to do).  Though at my age (62) it's more like maintaining what I've got!

     

    Good luck.  Maybe I'll see you at Boston some day.

     

    Len





    Len

  • Beer and Cupcakes Legend 970 posts since
    Nov 19, 2009

    I spent alot of time and alot of frustration tangled up deciphering V02max,  its meaning,  its accuracy in evaluating performance,  its implication to potential performance improvments and its usefullness in determining 'what to do'. 

     

    Conclusion:  Not helpful or useful, not accurate in determining above, and very misleading in the wrong hands.

     

    Why?: Several reasons but here's 2 big ones.

    1. V02max ability is reportedly largely genetic with limits to how much it can be improved, reportedly, of 5-15% max.  OK,  but there are V02 max tools on the web that will calculate V02Max from a recent race.  Mine has increased 31% in the 2 years Ive been running,  and I have no intention to stop improving.  Now the argument is Im making improvements to my efficiency etc,  and not V02 max.  Ok fine,  then what the hell do I do with V02 max again?
    2. Elite atheletes have V02 max scores that vary by 25% one to the next, see below.  Their racing performance does not vary by 25%, but a fraction of that, these guys are worlds top racers, seconds apart in their times.   So once again,  what the hell do I do with their V02 scores?

     

    Lately Im using the McMillan calculator based on my latest performance and am finding is usefull and helpful so far.

     

     

    AthleteEventVO2 Max
    Bjorn DaehlieCross country skier90.0
    Miguel IndurainCyclist (winner of Tour de France)88.0
    John Ngugi5 times world cross country champ85.0
    Dave Bedford10km World Record holder85.0
    Steve Prefontaine1 mile in 3:54.684.4
    Lance ArmstrongCyclist (winner of Tour de France)84.0
    Joan BenoitMarathon runner (2:24:52)78.6
    Bill RodgersMarathon runner (2:09:27)78.5
    Sebastian CoeMiddle distance (1 mile WR)77.0
    Grete WaitzMarathon runner (WR 1980)73.0
    Frank ShorterMarathon runner71.0
    Derek ClaytonMarathon runner (WR 1969)69.7




    Virtual Racing Antagonist.  I run for beer and cupcakes.kenyan.jpg

    1 Mile PR 6:44

    5K PR 22:21 

    10K PR 48:30

    Half Marathon PR  1:48:43 

    Marathon PR - 4:09:10  

    i before e except after c, weird?

  • Beer and Cupcakes Legend 970 posts since
    Nov 19, 2009

    Here's an interesting article.  http://www.active.com/running/Articles/How-to-Maximize-Your-VO2max-Training.htm?cmp=17-4990&utm_source=sendible&utm_medium=feed

     

    Not so much on VO2Max itself per se, but on the benefits and techniques of training at your max.

     

    cheers.





    Virtual Racing Antagonist.  I run for beer and cupcakes.kenyan.jpg

    1 Mile PR 6:44

    5K PR 22:21 

    10K PR 48:30

    Half Marathon PR  1:48:43 

    Marathon PR - 4:09:10  

    i before e except after c, weird?

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